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Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 10:37 am
by Ky hills
farmerjan wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 10:04 am
I am wondering at Tenaj 's comment about stepping in cowshyt and then walking in one's home. Not liking the smell or the mess. Is this the problem? Do they have to go "through" the cattle to get into and out of their home? It was my understanding that the cows were along the fenceline and she felt it was too close to her house. If, as I read it, both places have been there since time began, then they must have moved into the house that had belonged to family and inherited? Otherwise, they would have been aware of all the smells that go along with the cattle? A cow just dropping a cowpie in the field does not have any lasting odor for very many feet away. If the cows are congregating along the fenceline as was suggested due to shade or water or something, then the smell could become overwhelming, to someone who was not used to it. But again, if these have been there forever, then it is clearly a matter of the occupants not having been raised there and realizing that is what it is.
I agree that the right to farm laws should come into play. I think that if the fences are on the property lines, then Tenaj is not being reasonable in a farming area. A wall that will prevent the sight,sounds, and smells are their only recourse on their own side of the property line. The owner of the adjoining property has the right to run the cattle there, if it is a permitted use of their farm land.
As far as slobs and living with class, if you are in a farm designated area, then you should have already known what is considered to be normal practices. If you want fancy and refined, then a farming area is not for you. There are smells that I find very offensive in cities and in industrial places. But, if I were to go live there, it would be with the knowledge that it is to be expected in that area.
There are too many people who "love the country and looking at the animals grazing on the hillsides" but they want it from a distance. They do not want to deal with the daily real life of farming but only the pastoral sights. Those people should not be living in a farming area. The only other recourse that I see is to use some of the things that are used to discourage animals such as predator scents that might cause the cattle to stay further away from the fences but I don't think there is much proof that it will work. Some types of trees or shrubs that are used as windbreaks will mitigate some of it and shield the house owner from the sights and some smells. Other than that, the houseowner really needs to accept it or to move elsewhere.
Good points. I would caution though that as far as planting shrubs for a barrier. Some shrubs are highly toxic to cattle such as Taxis and Yews.

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 11:06 am
by greybeard
Tenaj wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 7:01 am
, do you have cattle living in your backyard, perhaps you like the fresh scent of cowshyt. Might be your favorite cologne too. you might be the one that steps in it then walks in your home with you cowshyt shoes all over your home. Not me!
Most of us here have cows living, grazing, shyting and calving just a few millimeters beyond our back, side or front yards. Just a barbed wire fence between the yard and their domains...keeps us from having to weed eat the yard fencline. :lol2:

Image

Cows wuz here before there was a yard ........or house..
Image

From my front porch.
Image

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 11:52 am
by TennesseeTuxedo
alisonb wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 10:08 am
HDRider wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 9:36 am
Cows on three sides and across the road. My cow's shyt don't stink.

People like you made laws like this necessary.

Right to farm laws in the United States deny nuisance lawsuits against farmers who use accepted and standard farming practices and have been in prior operation even if these practices harm or bother adjacent property owners or the general public. ... All 50 states have some form of Right to Farm law.
Perhaps OP is not American...no mention is made where situated.
Has to a US citizen, other folks have better sense.

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 11:52 am
by TennesseeTuxedo
HDRider wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 9:38 am
What is a "Trump Wall"?
One that never gets built?

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 12:11 pm
by alisonb
TennesseeTuxedo wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 11:52 am
Has to a US citizen, other folks have better sense.
Well perhaps so...see 'your' is used instead of 'you're' :P

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 12:31 pm
by alisonb
coprophobia :lol2:

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 12:47 pm
by Bright Raven
My opinion on the veracity of this thread. I don't have a clue if the Original poster is a "troll". Just remember, the world is full of this kind of naive thought. All you can do is take them at face value, that is what I did. I would rather error on the side of being duped than being rude!

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 1:09 pm
by JW IN VA
farmerjan wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 10:04 am
I am wondering at Tenaj 's comment about stepping in cowshyt and then walking in one's home. Not liking the smell or the mess. Is this the problem? Do they have to go "through" the cattle to get into and out of their home? It was my understanding that the cows were along the fenceline and she felt it was too close to her house. If, as I read it, both places have been there since time began, then they must have moved into the house that had belonged to family and inherited? Otherwise, they would have been aware of all the smells that go along with the cattle? A cow just dropping a cowpie in the field does not have any lasting odor for very many feet away. If the cows are congregating along the fenceline as was suggested due to shade or water or something, then the smell could become overwhelming, to someone who was not used to it. But again, if these have been there forever, then it is clearly a matter of the occupants not having been raised there and realizing that is what it is.
I agree that the right to farm laws should come into play. I think that if the fences are on the property lines, then Tenaj is not being reasonable in a farming area. A wall that will prevent the sight,sounds, and smells are their only recourse on their own side of the property line. The owner of the adjoining property has the right to run the cattle there, if it is a permitted use of their farm land.
As far as slobs and living with class, if you are in a farm designated area, then you should have already known what is considered to be normal practices. If you want fancy and refined, then a farming area is not for you. There are smells that I find very offensive in cities and in industrial places. But, if I were to go live there, it would be with the knowledge that it is to be expected in that area.
There are too many people who "love the country and looking at the animals grazing on the hillsides" but they want it from a distance. They do not want to deal with the daily real life of farming but only the pastoral sights. Those people should not be living in a farming area. The only other recourse that I see is to use some of the things that are used to discourage animals such as predator scents that might cause the cattle to stay further away from the fences but I don't think there is much proof that it will work. Some types of trees or shrubs that are used as windbreaks will mitigate some of it and shield the house owner from the sights and some smells. Other than that, the houseowner really needs to accept it or to move elsewhere.
Well said.

I would try to plant some trees or bushes that would that would filter or mask the smells.I would,however make sure that those plants do not encroach on the neighboring property especially if they are poisonous to the cattle.
The bottom line is even if the properties have been owned for generations it would be the duty of the new homeowner to have made the decision about the situation before moving in.
Personally I don't think it's right for someone to come to an area and then expect it to change to suit their lifestyle.If I moved into the city and wanted to bring a cow or two or maybe do a little shooting in the backyard,I doubt that would be welcome.Neither would my dented pickup with 3" glasspack.
Not hating on the OP.Just pointing out we need to consider everything when we decide to change where we live.

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 1:26 pm
by alisonb
Tenaj wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 7:09 am
Yes I agree Bright Raven, thank you for your kind answer too.
Tenaj wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 8:06 am
Thank you for taking my question seriously Bright Raven, you are the most caring and understanding person on this site I have spoken to so far. That is a true compliment.
Tenaj wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 8:20 am
Thanks Bright Raven. You are the kindest person on this site! Compliment well deserved.

Thanks for all your time today. You are awesome!
OMW...my hero :pretty: :nod: :tiphat: :clap:

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 1:37 pm
by Bright Raven
alisonb wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 1:26 pm
Tenaj wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 7:09 am
Yes I agree Bright Raven, thank you for your kind answer too.
Tenaj wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 8:06 am
Thank you for taking my question seriously Bright Raven, you are the most caring and understanding person on this site I have spoken to so far. That is a true compliment.
Tenaj wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 8:20 am
Thanks Bright Raven. You are the kindest person on this site! Compliment well deserved.

Thanks for all your time today. You are awesome!
OMW...my hero :pretty: :nod: :tiphat: :clap:
I don't take you serious. But for the consideration of the Moderators and Mr. Gravlee, I want to assure them I am not impersonating any other user. I never have and don't have any intentions of doing do.

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 2:00 pm
by Hippie Rancher
ah, now your other question makes more sense. a nimby. good luck with that.

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 3:50 pm
by BRYANT
my cows can come down my drive to the garage, cant get in the yard. but if the garage door is left open more than once the cows or the mules will come right in the garage. I try to keep them away but sometimes it just does not work , the mules are the worst they would come in the house if I let them or should I say if my wife would let them. She says we look like a bunch of HILLBILLIES with a mule standing in the garage ???? well maybe I am ??? much rather wake up to cows and livestock in the yard as wake up in the city to drug deals and gun fire.

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 4:45 pm
by Nesikep
Move the fence that other 10ft further out to your property line, build the trump wall, that's about what can be done.. or move the house, but that's a lot harder.

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 5:31 pm
by HDRider
alisonb wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 10:08 am
HDRider wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 9:36 am
Cows on three sides and across the road. My cow's shyt don't stink.

People like you made laws like this necessary.

Right to farm laws in the United States deny nuisance lawsuits against farmers who use accepted and standard farming practices and have been in prior operation even if these practices harm or bother adjacent property owners or the general public. ... All 50 states have some form of Right to Farm law.
Perhaps OP is not American...no mention is made where situated.
You are correct.

Re: Help Please! How to keep cattle away from my home

Posted: Sat May 18, 2019 6:18 pm
by sstterry
Ask the owner if you grain feed them grain daily at a spot further away. He may be grateful. That can get expensive though.