Temperament- Cattle

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alisonb
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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by alisonb » Fri May 24, 2019 12:01 pm

Thanks for the replies folks.

Would I be correct in saying that the bigger the herd less tolerance is shown towards bad temperament?


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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by TennesseeTuxedo » Fri May 24, 2019 12:08 pm

alisonb wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 12:01 pm
Thanks for the replies folks.

Would I be correct in saying that the bigger the herd less tolerance is shown towards bad temperament?
I'd say just the opposite. A bad actor stands way out in a smaller group.
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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by Dave » Fri May 24, 2019 12:20 pm

Here bigger groups are handled horse back so it is easier to hide. Certainly spooky cattle are tolerated more. Eventually there are people around them on foot. Man eaters show themselves. In bigger herds people are not in love with individual cows. Bad actors get shipped. Everyone who runs cows full time for a living has been run over before. It isn't nearly as much fun as you might think. They don't think twice about shipping a cow or bull.

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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by lithuanian farmer » Fri May 24, 2019 12:31 pm

A tame herd is a must if you have to spend more time working with cattle. At the moment all cows let me to pet them, scratch many places, some let you to touch everywhere you want, some have their favorite spots and those spots, which you better not touch or they'll walk away. Two days ago just sold the second calf cow, which was the only one, which wouldn't let me touch her. Don't have any nice facilities for their handling all year round, so they need to be calm. Cows for AI are moved with a bucket of meal into the simple portable steel pen in the field, then put a halter on and tie to the fence. Many have never seen a rope, so they aren't that happy about it and sometimes a simple tieing to the fence isn't enough- tractor is much more reliable. But very few cows need it. Heifers have abit more complex steel pen system for AI.
Some cattle keep their distance from people even as they get elder, so such heifers are culled most of the time. If it's just a small distance, but animal isn't flighty she can be left. Most start trusting me more by the time they calve with their first calves. I try to find some time to just walk around cattle, give them a gentle touch, let them sniff or lick me. It's very helpful for the calves and weanlings to get used to you. Last year one heifer calf would always keep a pretty decent distance from people. After weaning heifers were fed with meal every day and human would walk in their pen each time. Sometimes I'd just stand in their pen for a couple minutes letting heifers to sniff me and by the spring she turned into the most gentle heifer from the whole group...
We move our cattle to the new pastures quite often, so it's nice when they are easy to handle and one person is enough to move them. Too calm lazy animals can be quite a pain when you need to move them though...
Have a couple extremely gentle cows. Can put a halter on in an open field and some can be AI'd with just a nose in the bucket of meal.
However, our cattle are that calm only to the people, who they see all the time- family members. There are plenty of cows which are ready to run away if an unknown person shows up in the field.
A very wild animal would cause many trouble for us as we spent a lot of time around cattle.
Mos of our calves don't let me near while they are with their moms. After weaning they settle down and most become very nice tempered. Some wouldn't let you touch them, but they get used to people walking in their pen and they don't keep very big distance. Don't require much from bulls, but they usually are calmer than heifers. Heifers are more active. Don't spend much time befriending those, which are destined for slaughtering, but spend more time with replacements. By the time they become cows, they all are good with my company and most don't mind me at the calving time. There are some, which don't like anybody around at the calving, but I spend extra time giving them more attention and petting on their last days before calving. It calms down them abit. They are ready to kill any kind of other species animal, but they tolerate me. Still keeping a close eye on them, often giving them a bucket of meal while I tag a calf and having a stick for some protection if needed.

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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by lithuanian farmer » Fri May 24, 2019 12:36 pm

alisonb wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 12:01 pm
Thanks for the replies folks.

Would I be correct in saying that the bigger the herd less tolerance is shown towards bad temperament?
From my experience it can be either way. Mostly it depends from the owner. Have seen people with big herds keeping some wild cows, because that they don't spent much time with cattle and they have workers which have to take care of animals. On the other hand in big herds there is a bigger selection of heifers, which can replace those wild hard to deal with cows. For a small farmer it's either sad to sell that wild cow, because that he doesn't have a big selection of heifers or he culls her immediately, because that it's a way too dangerous to keep a wild cow in a small family farm.

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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by Fire Sweep Ranch » Fri May 24, 2019 1:49 pm

Docility is huge on our small farm (30 cows). A perfect example today:
Built Right embryo bull calf, born December. Crazy as a loon! We halter the calves every Sunday after church. We gave up on him, he literally tries to kill you if you try to settle him at all. I have so many bruises on my knees and legs from him. So, vet came out today to calfhood our heifers and I decided to get this crazy bull calf cut. We had him in the pen behind the chute, and tried to move him into the smaller pen behind the chute. He went nuts, ramed me hard, broke the hinges on the 14 foot gate, and slipped under the gate. Ran through two more hot fences, totally scared out of his mind. Vet told me to load him on the trailer as is, and sell the jerk. So, getting him on the trailer will be the fun part! I have only had one other calf like that on our place, and amazingly, it was this bull's flush brother! We had to do the same thing with him; load him on the trailer and hope we get to the stockyards without him killing himself or others!!!
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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by Stocker Steve » Fri May 24, 2019 2:30 pm

[quote="Fire Sweep Ranch" Vet told me to load him on the trailer as is, and sell the jerk. So, getting him on the trailer will be the fun part! I have only had one other calf like that on our place, and amazingly, it was this bull's flush brother! We had to do the same thing with him; load him on the trailer and hope we get to the stockyards without him killing himself or others!!! [/quote]

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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by Nesikep » Fri May 24, 2019 6:44 pm

I'd say it's more important on small places.. Large places handle on horseback and will be set up so the cows just have to go where you want them to.
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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by alisonb » Sat May 25, 2019 12:31 pm

Judge each nut case on it's own merits :D
Thanks all!
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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by TennesseeTuxedo » Sat May 25, 2019 12:47 pm

alisonb wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 12:31 pm
Judge each nut case on it's own merits :D
Thanks all!
Same goes for people.
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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by TCRanch » Sat May 25, 2019 1:32 pm

Nesikep wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 6:44 pm
I'd say it's more important on small places.. Large places handle on horseback and will be set up so the cows just have to go where you want them to.
I've shipped out most of my freaks and have no regrets at all
This! We've only had one bull with attitude and the decision to sell him was immediately after he tried to take out my husband. Told a friend about it the night it happened and he happens to work on a very large ranch in Oklahoma. His boss called us the next day, came over & bought the bull - they do everything on horseback & with dogs and he wanted that bulls EPD's. They still have him. I have a couple ornery cows & some divas but mean &/or flighty isn't tolerated. At all!

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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by Nesikep » Sat May 25, 2019 2:59 pm

TCRanch wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 1:32 pm
Nesikep wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 6:44 pm
I'd say it's more important on small places.. Large places handle on horseback and will be set up so the cows just have to go where you want them to.
I've shipped out most of my freaks and have no regrets at all
This! We've only had one bull with attitude and the decision to sell him was immediately after he tried to take out my husband. Told a friend about it the night it happened and he happens to work on a very large ranch in Oklahoma. His boss called us the next day, came over & bought the bull - they do everything on horseback & with dogs and he wanted that bulls EPD's. They still have him. I have a couple ornery cows & some divas but mean &/or flighty isn't tolerated. At all!
I don't mind a cow that's a little snorty at calving time, though any little trouble with the calf takes 4 times more effort to fix.. Most of mine are pretty sweet though
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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by Ky hills » Sun May 26, 2019 7:20 am

Fire Sweep Ranch wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 1:49 pm
Docility is huge on our small farm (30 cows). A perfect example today:
Built Right embryo bull calf, born December. Crazy as a loon! We halter the calves every Sunday after church. We gave up on him, he literally tries to kill you if you try to settle him at all. I have so many bruises on my knees and legs from him. So, vet came out today to calfhood our heifers and I decided to get this crazy bull calf cut. We had him in the pen behind the chute, and tried to move him into the smaller pen behind the chute. He went nuts, ramed me hard, broke the hinges on the 14 foot gate, and slipped under the gate. Ran through two more hot fences, totally scared out of his mind. Vet told me to load him on the trailer as is, and sell the jerk. So, getting him on the trailer will be the fun part! I have only had one other calf like that on our place, and amazingly, it was this bull's flush brother! We had to do the same thing with him; load him on the trailer and hope we get to the stockyards without him killing himself or others!!!
Your vet gave some good advice there. I know you will but please be extra careful getting that calf up and loaded. We have had to deal with a few of those mostly bought cattle or neighbors cattle that have gotten in on us. My advice is to say some prayers before and make some extra reinforcemts in the loading area and always have a clear escape plan beforehand.. Went through that a couple weeks ago with neighbors Jersey type bull.

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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by alisonb » Sun May 26, 2019 10:58 am

Stocker Steve wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 2:30 pm
Every so often, it is cheaper to use a deer rifle. :cowboy:
A couple of year ago I bought 7 Bonsmara weaners. Offloaded them and 1 took off, clearing 3 fences, we could not get him back no matter what we tried :shock:
Few is the number who think with their own minds and feel with their own hearts. Albert Einstein
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Re: Temperament- Cattle

Post by Stocker Steve » Sun May 26, 2019 6:32 pm

[quote=alisonb A couple of year ago I bought 7 Bonsmara weaners. Offloaded them and 1 took off, clearing 3 fences, we could not get him back no matter what we tried :shock:
[/quote]

Ranch hunts are popular in some areas. :nod:
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