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chipsahoy
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Re: Housing

Post by chipsahoy » Fri Mar 06, 2020 7:13 am

There is no reason I can't have the best of both worlds really. They can be is stalls like the oxen I pictured at night and during the storms and I can turn then out into a corral in the day time or at least an hour a day sort of thing for exercise.



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Dsth
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Re: Housing

Post by Dsth » Fri Mar 06, 2020 8:53 am

I live in Iowa USA and winters can be nasty here also. I really feel sorry for cattle that are outside in bitter cold weather. Larger herds can huddle together to help block the wind and share body heat as a group, but with two cows, that would not work for them. You would need at least a three sided shelter with open side facing South. preferably a four sided shelter with good ventilation to prevent high humidity inside. Keeping them in a tie stall style barn would not be for me since I think cattle are more comfortable when they can move around freely. My advise would be to try and find a suitable farm that custom raises cattle in the winter and bring them back home when the weather warms up. I think that would be more feasible than building a suitable winter housing facility unless you are expanding to a bigger herd later in the future.

chipsahoy
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Re: Housing

Post by chipsahoy » Fri Mar 06, 2020 12:31 pm

Dsth wrote:
Fri Mar 06, 2020 8:53 am
I live in Iowa USA and winters can be nasty here also. I really feel sorry for cattle that are outside in bitter cold weather. Larger herds can huddle together to help block the wind and share body heat as a group, but with two cows, that would not work for them. You would need at least a three sided shelter with open side facing South. preferably a four sided shelter with good ventilation to prevent high humidity inside. Keeping them in a tie stall style barn would not be for me since I think cattle are more comfortable when they can move around freely. My advise would be to try and find a suitable farm that custom raises cattle in the winter and bring them back home when the weather warms up. I think that would be more feasible than building a suitable winter housing facility unless you are expanding to a bigger herd later in the future.
This might be a very viable idea. There are retired dairy farmers that board heifers, and would probably board beef cattle as well. They charge 2.50 per day including forage. They are tie barns too.

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Re: Housing

Post by chipsahoy » Sun Mar 08, 2020 5:59 pm

Ok, so if winter housing is an issue for large animals, and I can only keep two cows anyway, maybe there is a better way to get my "cattle fix"

I figure each cow is going to cost at least a thousand dollars by first calf. I can't keep the calves through the next winter so would be selling them at 6 months.

Maybe it would make better sense to buy two dairy/beef cross calves in February. They only need small pens, raise them to spring, keep them on grass and grain outside for the summer and sell them in November. They would be 9 month feeders...…..but would have cost 75 dollars and some milk replacer and feed. But I don't have the expense of wintering a cow which I believe would cost at least 75-100 dollars a month.

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Re: Housing

Post by greggy » Wed Mar 18, 2020 6:00 am

Buy an old british or scottish breed, they really will prob be ok....

Do not buy anything that was bred to take heat....

Ironically we freeze in winter and get pretty hot summers, lot of aus is like that, some places boiling hot in day and lime a desert...cold at night.

Feed them well, they will likey cope, give a wind break for when really nasty conditions combine....

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Re: Housing

Post by greggy » Wed Mar 18, 2020 6:03 am

PS you should see how many tiny, wet, little lambs get born in horrid conditions, it is like the mothers decide...yep, it is wet and cold enough......

Most survive, they simply have to on larger properties.....a grown member of the cattle family would fare much better....

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