newborn calf question

The place to start if you are new!
Post Reply
User avatar
nocows
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2017 10:48 am
Location: MO
Has thanked: 18 times
Been thanked: 10 times

newborn calf question

Post by nocows » Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:43 am

I will try to keep this short..... just looking for some opinions. I had a cow trying to calve yesterday. Enough time had passed I thought it was about time to come up with a game plan. I got her up into the pens close to the chute and decided to give her so more time and if I did need to do something she would already be where I needed her.

I just let her be gave her some space so she could do her thing I know just getting her up into the corral was stressful enough. I went back about 30 minutes later and she was laid down by the bale ring there was enough old hay and around it that it was kind of built up. She messed around and rolled over on her right side and was stuck. The calf had it's legs and nose out but she was struggling and it was a pretty good sized calf. I went ahead and pulled the calf while she was laying there, then got the loader and got her up right. Left them locked up for several hours all seemed well the calf was sucking she cleaned him off etc...

Last night I opened the pen and just left it open so she could leave if she wanted, this morning it's raining I went out there she never did eat the afterbirth and she left the pen went down into the woods. Left the calf up here laying by the fence.

So far this morning she has made zero attempt to come check the calf. This is her 3rd calf so she isn't new to this.... When I went to go check on the cow she was a little hunched up and she did pass something as I was standing there assuming some more afterbirth it was just some fluid and stuff.

My question is did it stress her out that much? should I let it be or try to move the calf down to her in the woods with her?

She's not a mean cow but she isn't exactly a pet she's an easy keeper and easy to get up with feed but she won't hang around.

Also rain has stopped may be some more light rain after awhile but nothing major and it's about 49 degrees so not freezing cold by any means.

So much for keeping it short.

Thoughts?



User avatar
alisonb
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5261
Joined: Sat Jul 11, 2009 7:37 am
Location: South Africa
Has thanked: 362 times
Been thanked: 316 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by alisonb » Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:47 am

"My question is did it stress her out that much? should I let it be or try to move the calf down to her in the woods with her? "

It's probably stress. Put the calf with her but keep an eye on them ;-)
Few is the number who think with their own minds and feel with their own hearts. Albert Einstein
Never trouble trouble till trouble troubles you!

User avatar
kenny thomas
GURU
GURU
Posts: 9250
Joined: Sun Nov 16, 2008 6:16 pm
Location: SW tip of Virginia
Has thanked: 25 times
Been thanked: 413 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by kenny thomas » Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:01 am

I'm of the thought that if she let the calf suck she knows where it is and will go back to it when it is time. Just watch till later today.
My thoughts only, don't bet the farm on them. KT

cowgirl8
GURU
GURU
Posts: 4944
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2014 5:37 am
Location: NE Texas
Has thanked: 8 times
Been thanked: 36 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by cowgirl8 » Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:25 am

Is the calf up? I'd lock her up with it. If it doesn't nurse or she wont let it, then put her in the chute and make her nurse it. I had a cow do this this year. Don't know why, but she was confused. We put her in the chute and let it nurse a couple times a day, eventually, she quit rejecting it. This was an older cow too.... happens with heifers, but sometimes with cows too....Calf need colostrum within 12 hours, no longer than 24.... give it to it yourself if you have to.... Milk the cow and bottle it into the calf... but you need to make sure that the calf gets it in time..
For those who understand, need no explanation, ....for those who don't, none will do

User avatar
kenny thomas
GURU
GURU
Posts: 9250
Joined: Sun Nov 16, 2008 6:16 pm
Location: SW tip of Virginia
Has thanked: 25 times
Been thanked: 413 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by kenny thomas » Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:28 am

cowgirl8 wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:25 am
Is the calf up? I'd lock her up with it. If it doesn't nurse or she wont let it, then put her in the chute and make her nurse it. I had a cow do this this year. Don't know why, but she was confused. We put her in the chute and let it nurse a couple times a day, eventually, she quit rejecting it. This was an older cow too.... happens with heifers, but sometimes with cows too....Calf need colostrum within 12 hours, no longer than 24.... give it to it yourself if you have to.... Milk the cow and bottle it into the calf... but you need to make sure that the calf gets it in time..
They stated that the calf was up and sucking. It's had colostrum it seems
My thoughts only, don't bet the farm on them. KT

User avatar
nocows
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2017 10:48 am
Location: MO
Has thanked: 18 times
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by nocows » Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:35 am

I have the hardest time knowing when to step in... I am my own worst enemy I can talk myself into or out of anything! That's why I like this forum it gives me a place to vent or talk out loud so to speak. I Appreciate others input and advice.

I like to let nature take care of it's self but I always second guess. I need more patience I will continue to monitor the situation I will be sure to update my post later on.

Thanks all.

76 Bar
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 955
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 1:17 pm
Location: South Western Oregon
Has thanked: 353 times
Been thanked: 264 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by 76 Bar » Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:44 am

My :2cents: FWIW. If possible I'd bring the cow back to the corral where she calved, make sure she recognizes the calf is hers & pen them in a hopefully protected & dry area until you're sure the calf is capable of traveling with her.

User avatar
farmerjan
GURU
GURU
Posts: 2861
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2016 7:54 pm
Location: Shenandoah ValleyVirginia
Has thanked: 421 times
Been thanked: 296 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by farmerjan » Wed Mar 18, 2020 11:14 am

Agree with 76 Bar. Bring her back to the pen where she calved. Make sure that the calf is close enough that when it gets up, it can find her as she seems to be a little confused. Make sure the calf is up and motivating well before you turn her back out. The calf may be a little "slow" from the long birthing time. Might just need a few days to make sure it is able to keep up with her and part of that is making sure it gets enough to eat the first couple of days. The cow might just think the calf needs to come with her. Some are not as considerate as others.

User avatar
Dsth
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 111
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:33 pm
Location: eastern Iowa
Has thanked: 24 times
Been thanked: 44 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by Dsth » Wed Mar 18, 2020 11:49 am

I agree that I would start by bringing the cow back to the area where the calf is. It is not unusual for a cow to leave her calf for a period of time. I hope the calf was able to get a good supply of colostrum. If you do not see the calf nurse or the calf is up looking for mommy but not reuniting with the cow, I would start offering it the bottle. I would move cow and calf to a small area if possible. It sounds to me that if the calf is laying comfortable it probably has a tommy full. Hope everything turns out good.

76 Bar
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 955
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 1:17 pm
Location: South Western Oregon
Has thanked: 353 times
Been thanked: 264 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by 76 Bar » Wed Mar 18, 2020 11:53 am

nocows wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 10:35 am
I have the hardest time knowing when to step in... I am my own worst enemy I can talk myself into or out of anything! That's why I like this forum it gives me a place to vent or talk out loud so to speak. I Appreciate others input and advice.
I like to let nature take care of it's self but I always second guess. I need more patience I will continue to monitor the situation I will be sure to update my post later on.
Thanks all.
Don't beat yourself up. Astute livestock skills are learned with an open mind & experience with procedures that cause the least stress. Hope your cow calf pair successfully bond & all goes well. ;-)

76 Bar
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 955
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 1:17 pm
Location: South Western Oregon
Has thanked: 353 times
Been thanked: 264 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by 76 Bar » Wed Mar 18, 2020 12:17 pm

It is not unusual for a cow to leave her calf for a period of time.
But of course when the calf is well past neonatal stage e.g. 2 months plus. Anything short of this time frame is an indicator of her lack of mothering ability.

User avatar
nocows
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2017 10:48 am
Location: MO
Has thanked: 18 times
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by nocows » Wed Mar 18, 2020 12:59 pm

Well the cow finally came up to the fence but wouldn't come into the pen to get with the calf. I let it be and she went back out into the pasture a couple of hundred yards away. After about another hour I went back out and took the opportunity to tag the calf. Then I simply rolled the calf under the sucker rod fence :cboy:

Just went and checked again and wouldn't you know it the cow came up to the calf and he is nursing right now! I will still keep an eye on her.

Thanks for listening sometimes just takes time I guess

Kingfisher
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5149
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 7:02 pm
Location: Austin Texas
Has thanked: 34 times
Been thanked: 39 times

Re: newborn calf question

Post by Kingfisher » Wed Mar 18, 2020 2:13 pm

She’s laughing at you...” Fooled him again. :). Glad they hooked back up for you
Green grass cures alot of ills.
The dream is free. The hustle is sold separate.

Post Reply