PLEASE HELP

The place to start if you are new!
Lynn

PLEASE HELP

Postby Lynn » Mon Feb 26, 2001 5:18 pm

I have a cow that I thought was bred,& it should be time for her to have a calf. she began to swell in the rear a week ago, but no calf, now the swelling has increased tremendously this week with some discharge. It also seems that her insides are hanging out. Please respond.
<br>
<br><hr size=4 width=75%><p>


mookie@tecinfo.com
0 x

Tim

Re: PLEASE HELP

Postby Tim » Mon Feb 26, 2001 6:44 pm

Lynn,<br>I'm no expert at this, but here are some things that I've learned. First, I noticed that my cows tended to start springing (swollen vulva area)at about 4 or 5 months into their pregnancies. Near time for calving, their rears became more swollen and also, their udders filled with milk. On the day they calved, their udders were tight and their teats were full and stiff looking. Both also seperated themselves from my other cows.<br>Is the cow posturing as if she needs to urinate? If so, she's probably in labor. My last heifer to calve walked around most of the day with her tail slightly extended from her body. When she'd have a contraction, she'd posture as if she needed to urinate. What you may see hanging out could be the water bag. In my two experiences with calving, the water bag presented, then ruptured. Shortly after, I saw feet. Do you see feet? Normally, a calf is born front feet first. With my two, it took maybe an hour from the time the waterbag ruptured until the calf was born.<br>My cows had a small amount of discharge from the vagina at least a month before calving. It was clear in color.<br>I'm not sure if I've helped you any. Perhaps some posters with lots more experience than I have will post a reply.<br>Hope all goes well. If you cow seems to be uncomfortable, straining and trying to calve, I'd call the vet and have him/her check. Or try getting a neighbor who has experience with cattle to take a look at her.<br>Tim<br>
<br>
<br><hr size=4 width=75%><p>
0 x

Mack

Re: Re: PLEASE HELP

Postby Mack » Mon Feb 26, 2001 7:16 pm

(User Above) wrote:: Lynn,<p>: I'm no expert at this, but here are some things that I've learned. First, I noticed that my cows tended to start springing (swollen vulva area)at about 4 or 5 months into their pregnancies. Near time for calving, their rears became more swollen and also, their udders filled with milk. On the day they calved, their udders were tight and their teats were full and stiff looking. Both also seperated themselves from my other cows.<br>: Is the cow posturing as if she needs to urinate? If so, she's probably in labor. My last heifer to calve walked around most of the day with her tail slightly extended from her body. When she'd have a contraction, she'd posture as if she needed to urinate. What you may see hanging out could be the water bag. In my two experiences with calving, the water bag presented, then ruptured. Shortly after, I saw feet. Do you see feet? Normally, a calf is born front feet first. With my two, it took maybe an hour from the time the waterbag ruptured until the calf was born.<br>: My cows had a small amount of discharge from the vagina at least a month before calving. It was clear in color.<br>: I'm not sure if I've helped you any. Perhaps some posters with lots more experience than I have will post a reply.<br>: Hope all goes well. If you cow seems to be uncomfortable, straining and trying to calve, I'd call the vet and have him/her check. Or try getting a neighbor who has experience with cattle to take a look at her.<br>: Tim<p><br>Lynn,<br>I have had some experience with calving but I don't claim to be an expert. I cannot dispute any thing Tim said except some of the timing, but that can vary a great deal also. The only thing I want to add is a word about what you said about looking like her insides were hanging out. If it was the water bag or the first stages of birth as Tim suggested, the whole thing should be over with by now. You should see front feet first, (after the water breaks) and then you should see the calves nose between his knees. If you see hind feet first, (The bottom of the hoofs will be facing up) I would recommend getting help from a vet or some one with a bit of experience. They can deliver unassisted when they come backwards but it is safer to have help available if needed.<p>The worst case scenerio, and I sure hope this is not the case. If you do see fleshy substance hanging from the cows vulva, and you can see that it is not calf parts and not mucus discharge, then you are probably looking at a prolapse. A prolapse can only get worse by the hour. You need to get a vet to look at her as soon as possible. He/she will probably want you to bring the cow to his/her facility where the proper equipment will be available to help her. I don't mean to be an alarmist, but when you said it looked like her insides were hanging out, It brought back bad memories. I have seen it once in the 12 years I have been in the business. The worst part is that once they prolapse, the next time she tries to calve will probably be worse.<p>I hope that by the time you get this, it will all be over and you have a lovely little calf. Best of luck,<p>Mack <br>

<br>
<br><hr size=4 width=75%><p>


mapxp@flash.net
0 x

Clay

Re: Re: Re: PLEASE HELP

Postby Clay » Sun Mar 11, 2001 8:52 pm

(User Above) wrote:: : Lynn,<p>: : I'm no expert at this, but here are some things that I've learned. First, I noticed that my cows tended to start springing (swollen vulva area)at about 4 or 5 months into their pregnancies. Near time for calving, their rears became more swollen and also, their udders filled with milk. On the day they calved, their udders were tight and their teats were full and stiff looking. Both also seperated themselves from my other cows.<br>: : Is the cow posturing as if she needs to urinate? If so, she's probably in labor. My last heifer to calve walked around most of the day with her tail slightly extended from her body. When she'd have a contraction, she'd posture as if she needed to urinate. What you may see hanging out could be the water bag. In my two experiences with calving, the water bag presented, then ruptured. Shortly after, I saw feet. Do you see feet? Normally, a calf is born front feet first. With my two, it took maybe an hour from the time the waterbag ruptured until the calf was born.<br>: : My cows had a small amount of discharge from the vagina at least a month before calving. It was clear in color.<br>: : I'm not sure if I've helped you any. Perhaps some posters with lots more experience than I have will post a reply.<br>: : Hope all goes well. If you cow seems to be uncomfortable, straining and trying to calve, I'd call the vet and have him/her check. Or try getting a neighbor who has experience with cattle to take a look at her.<br>: : Tim<p>: <br>: Lynn,<br>: I have had some experience with calving but I don't claim to be an expert. I cannot dispute any thing Tim said except some of the timing, but that can vary a great deal also. The only thing I want to add is a word about what you said about looking like her insides were hanging out. If it was the water bag or the first stages of birth as Tim suggested, the whole thing should be over with by now. You should see front feet first, (after the water breaks) and then you should see the calves nose between his knees. If you see hind feet first, (The bottom of the hoofs will be facing up) I would recommend getting help from a vet or some one with a bit of experience. They can deliver unassisted when they come backwards but it is safer to have help available if needed.<p>: The worst case scenerio, and I sure hope this is not the case. If you do see fleshy substance hanging from the cows vulva, and you can see that it is not calf parts and not mucus discharge, then you are probably looking at a prolapse. A prolapse can only get worse by the hour. You need to get a vet to look at her as soon as possible. He/she will probably want you to bring the cow to his/her facility where the proper equipment will be available to help her. I don't mean to be an alarmist, but when you said it looked like her insides were hanging out, It brought back bad memories. I have seen it once in the 12 years I have been in the business. The worst part is that once they prolapse, the next time she tries to calve will probably be worse.<p>: I hope that by the time you get this, it will all be over and you have a lovely little calf. Best of luck,<p>: Mack <p>

<br>
<br><hr size=4 width=75%><p>
0 x


Return to “Beginners Board”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests