jersey cow

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Clay

jersey cow

Postby Clay » Mon Mar 12, 2001 1:26 am

I am looking into getting a jersey cow and buying a couple of baby heifer calves for her to raise. Just wondering if it's worth it, or is it too much trouble. They will be next to my house on 3 acres, so I will be able to keep a good eye on them.
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rick beckard

Re: jersey cow

Postby rick beckard » Mon Mar 12, 2001 2:19 pm

(User Above) wrote:: I am looking into getting a jersey cow and buying a couple of baby heifer calves for her to raise. Just wondering if it's worth it, or is it too much trouble. They will be next to my house on 3 acres, so I will be able to keep a good eye on them.<p>you darn right it worth jerseys are my favorite breed in the world!!!!!!11

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Jennifer

Re: jersey cow

Postby Jennifer » Mon Mar 12, 2001 7:27 pm

(User Above) wrote:: I am looking into getting a jersey cow and buying a couple of baby heifer calves for her to raise. Just wondering if it's worth it, or is it too much trouble. They will be next to my house on 3 acres, so I will be able to keep a good eye on them.<p>To us, cattle are enjoyable; but keep in mind, most enjoyable things require some work. I can see at least one benefit - you should not have to cut the 3 acres of grass. Things you may want to keep in mind. You may need (or have to hire your vet w/his portable chute) a facility to "work"/medicate/vaccinate. A possible source for winter feed (hay). A feed bunk & hay ring & possibly a small trailer for hauling. <p>I have heard good things about Jerseys. We raise Angus, so I could tell you all kinds of wonderful things about them. You may want to consider instead of a couple of heifers, maybe one steer calf (of coarse, I would recommend an angus or angus cross)(& a heifer). You could raise your own beef (if you or your family wouldn't have a problem eating Norman the pet steer) - it is hard to beat the taste & flavor of home raised beef. <p>It is only when things go wrong or your heifers are prowling to calve in freezing rain or during a 40 mph with a -40 windchill that you ask yourself (at around 2am) why am I doing this? Also it is a little hard to take a vacation unless someone does your daily chores while you're away (it's not too bad in the summer, except for possible pinkeye).<p>Best of Luck. I'll warn you though, they can be addictive - we started out with 3 hobby cows & now have close to 50 mommas - so much for a hobby, it is now a business.

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ameyers@mail.win.org
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Clay

Re: Re: jersey cow

Postby Clay » Tue Mar 13, 2001 8:35 am

(User Above) wrote:: : I am looking into getting a jersey cow and buying a couple of baby heifer calves for her to raise. Just wondering if it's worth it, or is it too much trouble. They will be next to my house on 3 acres, so I will be able to keep a good eye on them.<p>: To us, cattle are enjoyable; but keep in mind, most enjoyable things require some work. I can see at least one benefit - you should not have to cut the 3 acres of grass. Things you may want to keep in mind. You may need (or have to hire your vet w/his portable chute) a facility to "work"/medicate/vaccinate. A possible source for winter feed (hay). A feed bunk & hay ring & possibly a small trailer for hauling. <p>: I have heard good things about Jerseys. We raise Angus, so I could tell you all kinds of wonderful things about them. You may want to consider instead of a couple of heifers, maybe one steer calf (of coarse, I would recommend an angus or angus cross)(& a heifer). You could raise your own beef (if you or your family wouldn't have a problem eating Norman the pet steer) - it is hard to beat the taste & flavor of home raised beef. <p>: It is only when things go wrong or your heifers are prowling to calve in freezing rain or during a 40 mph with a -40 windchill that you ask yourself (at around 2am) why am I doing this? Also it is a little hard to take a vacation unless someone does your daily chores while you're away (it's not too bad in the summer, except for possible pinkeye).<p>: Best of Luck. I'll warn you though, they can be addictive - we started out with 3 hobby cows & now have close to 50 mommas - so much for a hobby, it is now a business.<p>I have about 80 cattle and pens now (not on my 3 acres by my house, but on 220 acres at my farm), and I keep all my heifers, I was just kinda of wanting to raise some instead of going all over Texas buying from auctions. Just something to mess with around the house.<p>

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Tim

Re: jersey cow

Postby Tim » Wed Mar 14, 2001 5:55 pm

Clay,<br>I have a jersey. I bought her to use as a nurse cow for my twin holstein heifers (2 yrs ago.) The twins were about 2 months old when I got her, so neither she nor they liked the idea, so I didn't force the issue. She's a very gentle lady. I can do most anything with her (cept milk her haha...haven't mastered that yet.) In november, one of my heifers (not one of the holsteins) had her first calf. Lucy, my jersey, has adopted him. He'll go from his mom to the jersey nursing. Guess he's gettin' the best of both worlds, huh? He is fat and fine!On the dairy that I bought my jersey, they had one in a small area with a couple of calves on her. She was very motherly toward them. One thing I've noticed bout my jersey...she'll be grazing in the heat of the day while the others are lying in the shade! She'll eat most anything too...not hard to please. I'd recommend one!<br>Tim<br>
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Jennifer

Re: Re: Re: jersey cow

Postby Jennifer » Thu Mar 15, 2001 12:34 pm

(User Above) wrote:: : : I am looking into getting a jersey cow and buying a couple of baby heifer calves for her to raise. Just wondering if it's worth it, or is it too much trouble. They will be next to my house on 3 acres, so I will be able to keep a good eye on them.<p>: : To us, cattle are enjoyable; but keep in mind, most enjoyable things require some work. I can see at least one benefit - you should not have to cut the 3 acres of grass. Things you may want to keep in mind. You may need (or have to hire your vet w/his portable chute) a facility to "work"/medicate/vaccinate. A possible source for winter feed (hay). A feed bunk & hay ring & possibly a small trailer for hauling. <p>: : I have heard good things about Jerseys. We raise Angus, so I could tell you all kinds of wonderful things about them. You may want to consider instead of a couple of heifers, maybe one steer calf (of coarse, I would recommend an angus or angus cross)(& a heifer). You could raise your own beef (if you or your family wouldn't have a problem eating Norman the pet steer) - it is hard to beat the taste & flavor of home raised beef. <p>: : It is only when things go wrong or your heifers are prowling to calve in freezing rain or during a 40 mph with a -40 windchill that you ask yourself (at around 2am) why am I doing this? Also it is a little hard to take a vacation unless someone does your daily chores while you're away (it's not too bad in the summer, except for possible pinkeye).<p>: : Best of Luck. I'll warn you though, they can be addictive - we started out with 3 hobby cows & now have close to 50 mommas - so much for a hobby, it is now a business.<p>: I have about 80 cattle and pens now (not on my 3 acres by my house, but on 220 acres at my farm), and I keep all my heifers, I was just kinda of wanting to raise some instead of going all over Texas buying from auctions. Just something to mess with around the house.<p>You obviousely have a good idea of what you're getting into (I thought you were a starting beginner). It's hard to beat home raised replacement heifers. Here in MO the university has started a replacement heifer program called the Show Me Select Heifer Program. They have sales throughout different locations in the state. They have met vaccination, pelvic, weight and breeding requirements - many lots are bred A.I. The lots are separated by breeder & calving interval as well. The sale in our area is usually around the 1st of Dec, where the heifers are due to calve that next spring. It has been a great success, as the buyers have confidence in what they are purchasing. I may be able to find you more information if you are interested. Maybe Texas has a program like this? I know the Show Me Heifer Sales are attracting out of state buyers.

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ameyers@mail.win.org
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Sally

Re: Re: Re: jersey cow

Postby Sally » Thu Mar 29, 2001 1:45 am

>Hi you really sound like a lady headed in the same direction me and my mother would like to go. We are well aware its not easy and calving is as we have seen not easy. But we have six healthy calves ,3hiefers,3steers one being a 3wk old holstien ,Charlois twins,black angus and a herford. Where logically should we go from here considering "hoof and mouth" we need to know should we buy buy buy or are there no market for orphaned calves. If so what are people looking for in them. We have been selling them at 4 1/2 to 5 wieghts.

Please advise. Sally
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