Idaman

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of your favorite breed.

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3waycross
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Re: Idaman

Postby 3waycross » Mon Apr 19, 2010 8:37 pm

Idaman wrote:Image

Superior E468. A straight Anxiety 4th and foundation sire for us.


NOW that's a BULL!!!!!!!!
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Mon Apr 19, 2010 8:56 pm

Franklin Nash had many sides to his personality and quite wide interests.

For one thing he was a very big fan of classical music. He was very involved with the local fine arts committee and had season tickets to their programs in his home town. I ddon't think he missed a concert if at all possible. One fall he insisted that my wife and I accompany him and his wife to the winter concerts. I guess he thought that i could use some culture to smooth out my red neck tendencies. I was a country music fan and followed Merle Haggard, Charlie Pride, and Tammy Winette. We went but by spring and several concerts he decided we weren't as enthralled as he had hoped so he kindly dropped the idea. Maybe the year before he had a membership quota to make as I noticed that the concerts were not heavily attended.

Another side to him was his love of agate and the making of belt buckles and bolo ties out of some of the most beautiful agate in the world. With his agate interest he made the buckles and bolos and took a course at a local community college to learn the art of silversmithing. He was really very good and I still have several belt buckles and bolos that he made. They are really treasured. He also had the most extensive collection of agate and arrow heads I have ever seen even though my experience is somewhat limited in that area.

Another facet was his love of still life paintings. He became acqunaited with a local artist that was really talented. Our house is filled with this mans paintings and we sure get lots of comments on their beauty. This is one area Franklin really got me interested and involved.

In this vein he got acquainted with a convict from the state prison, that was in our home town. Franklin wanted him to paint some pictures of his cattle from photographs. The guy was totally amazing and he was incarcerated for you guessed it, forgery. We were so impressed that I even contracted him to do a picture of Carls old herd bull and gave it to Carl. This guy could write with both hands sentences that you had to hold up to a mirror to read. He could also write a sentence backwards with his right hand and the same sentence forward with his left hand.

I have always been grateful for the diversity Franklin brought to my life.
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Re: Idaman

Postby hillsdown » Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:41 pm

Idaman wrote:Franklin Nash had many sides to his personality and quite wide interests.

For one thing he was a very big fan of classical music. He was very involved with the local fine arts committee and had season tickets to their programs in his home town. I ddon't think he missed a concert if at all possible. One fall he insisted that my wife and I accompany him and his wife to the winter concerts. I guess he thought that i could use some culture to smooth out my red neck tendencies. I was a country music fan and followed Merle Haggard, Charlie Pride, and Tammy Winette. We went but by spring and several concerts he decided we weren't as enthralled as he had hoped so he kindly dropped the idea. Maybe the year before he had a membership quota to make as I noticed that the concerts were not heavily attended.

Another side to him was his love of agate and the making of belt buckles and bolo ties out of some of the most beautiful agate in the world. With his agate interest he made the buckles and bolos and took a course at a local community college to learn the art of silversmithing. He was really very good and I still have several belt buckles and bolos that he made. They are really treasured. He also had the most extensive collection of agate and arrow heads I have ever seen even though my experience is somewhat limited in that area.

Another facet was his love of still life paintings. He became acqunaited with a local artist that was really talented. Our house is filled with this mans paintings and we sure get lots of comments on their beauty. This is one area Franklin really got me interested and involved.

In this vein he got acquainted with a convict from the state prison, that was in our home town. Franklin wanted him to paint some pictures of his cattle from photographs. The guy was totally amazing and he was incarcerated for you guessed it, forgery. We were so impressed that I even contracted him to do a picture of Carls old herd bull and gave it to Carl. This guy could write with both hands sentences that you had to hold up to a mirror to read. He could also write a sentence backwards with his right hand and the same sentence forward with his left hand.

I have always been grateful for the diversity Franklin brought to my life.


From your stories and experiences YOU need to write a book (if you haven't already ) I for one will definitely read it. One of my very dear friends ,who is now 87 ,and has raised herfs since 1930 + has many many stories about the herf breed and all of his adventures. I have been asking him for years to tell it all so it is recorded . I just hope this is the year that he does it.
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Re: Idaman

Postby 1914 Hereford » Mon Apr 19, 2010 10:28 pm

Idaman,

I am Franklin's daughter, Jane Nash Deewall. Mike and I have enjoyed most of your stories and the good comments about the cattle. The family and I are unaware of the falling out that you write about. I know that to Daddy, your moving to Canada was, for him, like loosing part of himself.

On the comments about religion and the Bull test manager. I think that if Dad could have figured out how to adopt him, he would have--he just thought the world of him! A rather funny story that expresses what a great, open minded Dad he was. When my two sisters and I came home from college and told Dad, who was on the school board at that time, that we didn't feel that we had been properly prepared for college, he promptly pulled the two boys out of the public schools system and enrolled them into a Catholic boys school, and when our younger sister was ready for high school, he enrolled her in the catholic girls school. Needless to say, during the next school board election, Dad was promptly defeated ! That just tickled him to death!

I think that my brother, Jeff, summed up how most of his true friends and family felt about Franklin in a penning that he did for Dad's memorial. " He life was clearly defined not by his words, but by his deeds. Every instance of his existence was predicated on a clear set of principles. Moral relativism was nowhere to be found in his makeup. He didn't have to say who or what he was. All of us here know what he was. A friend of his once said to us, " that is the most honest man I have ever known." Another allowed, referring to his work prowess,"that is the most man I know." Of his many facets, integrity, honesty and his sense of the right action every time were his trademarks. His generosity, in my mind, is legendary. These were just small components of his complexity. He was so complex that he really can't be very well defined. Even though he really was a cowboy, he was definitely not the stereotypical cowboy.

He valued most the gift of his wife, with the ideals of duty to country, family friends and the pursuit of the perfect Hereford bull running a close second. This stalwart character was a connoisseur of fine art, opera, classical music, art glass, lapidary and jewelry making, dancing, education, reading,and numerous other interests. In all these endeavors he was self educated about each and expert in many. A person could expound endlessly on the phenomenon that was Franklin Nash. It may be enough to say that he was the most powerful force I have ever encountered......Jeff Franklin Nash
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Re: Idaman

Postby 3waycross » Mon Apr 19, 2010 10:35 pm

Ain't it funny how the world looks different through other people's eyes.....Just sayin. :nod:
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Re: Idaman

Postby KNERSIE » Tue Apr 20, 2010 12:47 am

Welcome to CT Jane, Jerry and I have spent many ours discussing you bulls through e-mails.
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Re: Idaman

Postby backhoeboogie » Tue Apr 20, 2010 4:58 am

1914 Hereford wrote:I am Franklin's daughter, Jane Nash Deewall.


:D Its an honor. I met your dad once.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Herefords.US » Tue Apr 20, 2010 8:29 am

Idaman, because of your posts, I’ve had the privilege of reading and studying the obituaries of two great men in the last week, Carl A Martin Jr. and Benjamin Franklin Nash.

Jane, reading the eulogy that your brother wrote for your father struck home – because so much of what was written also applied to my father. In fact, the first sentence of the eulogy that I wrote for him was: “He was the most honest man I’ve ever known.” My father was a Marine and there’s a chance he was on Guadalcanal at the same time your father was there.

It occurred to me that the greatness of these men personally affected each of us that knew them, but some of that greatness wasn’t unique and it was present in many of the American people who were from the same era. I’m sure a lot of the baby boomers revere their parents in a similar manner.

They were the ones that grew up during the tough times of the Great Depression, fought and won World War II. Then they came home and rolled up their sleeves to collectively build arguably the greatest nation and superpower ever in the world.

Time will tell whether they eventually find their deserved place among the greatest civilizations in history.

In his book, The Greatest Generation, Tom Brokaw refers to them in this way:
"it is, I believe, the greatest generation any society has ever produced."


A number of these great people still walk the street of every city in America. I can think of several here in Erath County, Texas whom I still see and visit with quite often.

Sadly, we are losing some of them every day and I feel that our greatness, as a society and a nation, is diminished with each one we lose.

Idaman, please continue on. And Hillsdown is right! You need to write a book.

George
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Re: Idaman

Postby alacattleman » Tue Apr 20, 2010 8:39 am

3waycross wrote:
Idaman wrote:Image

Superior E468. A straight Anxiety 4th and foundation sire for us.


NOW that's a BULL!!!!!!!![/quote] you got that right,,, what a difference a few days make,,, they where ready to hang him out too dry a few days ago :P
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Tue Apr 20, 2010 8:41 am

Hi Jane and welcome to the discussion. Our impressions of your dad are very close with you being once removed and me being twice removed. He absolutely was one of the most honest men I ever knew.With others being in the cattle business being Carl Martin, Jack Koster(unmentioned yet but from Canada), Al and our son. Our son is almost too much so. When we try to sell a ranch or anything we all laugh that we have to keep the lookers away from him or he will tell them all the faults and bad points first. He would be a disaster around a purebred operation. On the other hand when he goes with me to look at any purchase he quietly stands off to one side and then at some time sidels over to me and points out all the faults of whatever we are appraising.

Not to overdo poor Franklin, but each memory just triggers another and there were many recalled with fond memories.

Franklin used to buy a lot of hay from us to feed his young bulls. He always wanted us to deliver the hay and stack it in the lofts of several of his scattered barns. This was quite a chore as we had to use a small truck to get into the spots he wanted. We left the semis at home. The hay had to be thrown into the loft and then packed to the back of the loft. This was no small chore and we certainly wouldn't have done it for anyone else.

One time the guy that was driving the truck, who also had a great sense of humor, agreed to fill the outhouse with bales. Franklin had always said to "fill everything to the brim" and so we thought we should oblige. You need to understand Franklins' out houses. They all sat on concrete floors were fairly large and quite frequently used.
As Franklin made his feed rounds he wanted them in very good condition. This outhouse at an outlying ranch called the open box was a nice large one and we really got it packed to the roof. We never heard a word from Franklin and grew somewhat apprehennsive. Several weeks later, after staying away from Franklin for obvious reasons, I received a letter in the mail from Franklin. In the letter was a picture of some long johns hanging on a clothesline that were very badly soiled on the rear flap. There was a note with the picture that said "drastic circumstances cause drastic problems". No other word about the incident was ever mentioned between us. I could just picture Franklin chuckling over his response.
Last edited by Idaman on Tue Apr 20, 2010 2:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Idaman

Postby 1914 Hereford » Tue Apr 20, 2010 11:26 am

Idaman,

He must have had to work to come up with that response. I didn't ever know of him owning a pair of flap seated long johns!
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Tue Apr 20, 2010 12:58 pm

I thought that they looked awfully new in the picture.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Herefords.US » Tue Apr 20, 2010 1:59 pm

Idaman wrote:Image

Superior E468. A straight Anxiety 4th and foundation sire for us.


What breeder did you get this bull from, Idaman?

George
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Tue Apr 20, 2010 2:32 pm

E468 was purchased from a man over near Aspen, Colorado. He was a new comer to the business having developed most of the land further down that valley, He had purchased the bull on his mother in a dispersion down in Texas. I bought him that day along with quite a few Pastorius cows that he also had. He would not sell me the dam of E468 which I lamented as she was bred back to the same bull. I have in my mind that he came, maybe several generations back, from the Pied Piper Farms, but I am not sure. I will try to research that and get back.

I was put on to this bull by a head extension agent from CSU who had been working with me on breeding cattle along the Hesperus way. His first name was Paul and I have been racking by brain for days to try to remember his last name. If anyone on here knows that please let me know. He also insisted that I get acquainted with Carl Martin as Carl was known more through the performance crowd than the conventional cattle circles.

When Paul told me about E468 or "Superior" as we called him, Paul said just go buy that calf no matter what. Great advice.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Herefords.US » Tue Apr 20, 2010 2:39 pm

Idaman wrote:E468 was purchased from a man over near Aspen, Colorado. He was a new comer to the business having developed most of the land further down that valley, He had purchased the bull on his mother in a dispersion down in Texas. I bought him that day along with quite a few Pastorius cows that he also had. He would not sell me the dam of E468 which I lamented as she was bred back to the same bull. I have in my mind that he came, maybe several generations back, from the Pied Piper Farms, but I am not sure. I will try to research that and get back.

I was put on to this bull by a head extension agent from CSU who had been working with me on breeding cattle along the Hesperus way. His first name was Paul and I have been racking by brain for days to try to remember his last name. If anyone on here knows that please let me know. He also insisted that I get acquainted with Carl Martin as Carl was known more through the performance crowd than the conventional cattle circles.

When Paul told me about E468 or "Superior" as we called him, Paul said just go buy that calf no matter what. Great advice.


No need to do research Idaman - he came from Palo Pinto Anxiety 4th Ranch (Barney Carter). We bought some cattle in the same dispersion that he sold in. Once I locate my catalog, I'll copy it and forward to you.

His name is actually Superior ANX E468.

I was hoping that you had known the manager of that ranch, H. A. Moseley. He was quite a fella'!

George
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