Curbing Bad Behavior

Discuss the ins and outs of the showring.
Post Reply
m_rachel17
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2019 2:36 pm
Has thanked: 4 times

Curbing Bad Behavior

Post by m_rachel17 » Wed Oct 23, 2019 2:41 pm

Hello all, I’m new to the cattle world and will be showing my first market steer at fair in July. I purchased a family friends beef feeder about a month ago. This steer was raised an orphan after his mother left him to die. He seemed perfectly behaved until he got to my house. I go into the pen and he will threaten and push me into corners and attempt to “rub” his head on my legs. With him being the size he is, 700-750 lbs, this isn’t as cute as it was when our friend was raising him as a calf. I’m wondering if anyone has any ideas or techniques that can be used to help curb this behavior? He is in a personal pen, is my only bovine, and gets out to run about every other day. Any and all advice is appreciated!



User avatar
Boot Jack Bulls
GURU
GURU
Posts: 1107
Joined: Fri Jun 05, 2015 7:03 pm
Location: NW WI
Has thanked: 9 times
Been thanked: 134 times

Re: Curbing Bad Behavior

Post by Boot Jack Bulls » Thu Oct 24, 2019 7:32 am

Just some thoughts here:
-He needs a pen mate. It will keep him happy, healthy, and teach him to be bovine and not human.
-He needs to learn respect. If he rubs on you, he has no sense of boundaries. A good thump on the nose may be all that's required to remind him.
-YOU need to avoid letting him get you into a corner...EVER! He may be playing now, but the one time he isn't and he gets you in a corner, you may end up dead. You need to think ahead of him and keep both his and your flight paths in mind at all times.
Aside from all that, you really should find a mentor that has at least a basic idea how to raise and grow a steer. Best of Luck!
Boot Jack Cattle LLC & Boot Jack Boers

User avatar
Jeanne - Simme Valley
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 11072
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 5:46 am
Location: Central Upstate New York
Has thanked: 560 times
Been thanked: 814 times

Re: Curbing Bad Behavior

Post by Jeanne - Simme Valley » Thu Oct 24, 2019 9:58 am

Boot Jack gave you good advice. YOU must be the Alpha. He must respect you. A smack to the nose generally works best. Their nose is soft (for your sake) and is sensitive. This is a very dangerous behavior.
Be sure to tie his head up at 'show" level, and brush him daily. This teaches him to stand still while you do what you want, and he will like it. Also, teaches him to stand for more than a few minutes at a time. Increase his time standing. Start out with 10-15 minutes, then 30 minutes, until you are able to have him stand tied for about 2 hours. This is like training an athlete. You can't go to a fair and expect him to stand for a couple of hours if he isn't trained to do it.
Simme Valley of New York - http://www.SimmeValley.com
"We make a living by what we get,
we make a life by what we give."

Buck Randall
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 177
Joined: Wed Jun 05, 2019 1:45 pm
Has thanked: 52 times
Been thanked: 115 times

Re: Curbing Bad Behavior

Post by Buck Randall » Thu Oct 24, 2019 11:31 pm

Remember that you probably aren't strong enough to seriously injure him, so don't hold back if you take a swing at him. A swift boot to the nose works well. He needs to know that you're serious and not just playing.

wbvs58
GURU
GURU
Posts: 4580
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2011 12:45 am
Location: S.E. Queensland, Australia
Has thanked: 295 times
Been thanked: 271 times

Re: Curbing Bad Behavior

Post by wbvs58 » Fri Oct 25, 2019 3:46 am

You must have pretty good looking legs.
Try a knuckle duster made up of a leather band with long staples nailed through it so they protrude the opposite side to what you hold. Just passively put your hand with the knuckle duster in front of his nose when he comes close, it spikes him in the nose and he is the one causing the pain. You are not acting aggressively toward him yet he gets the message.

Ken

m_rachel17
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2019 2:36 pm
Has thanked: 4 times

Re: Curbing Bad Behavior

Post by m_rachel17 » Fri Oct 25, 2019 10:22 am

Thank you all! I’ve been stuck between wanting to be the nice guy and the necessary evil of being the boss. These are all helpful though thank you!

User avatar
Jeanne - Simme Valley
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 11072
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 5:46 am
Location: Central Upstate New York
Has thanked: 560 times
Been thanked: 814 times

Re: Curbing Bad Behavior

Post by Jeanne - Simme Valley » Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:19 am

You can be the nice guy - just have to be the guy in charge - at all times.
Simme Valley of New York - http://www.SimmeValley.com
"We make a living by what we get,
we make a life by what we give."

User avatar
sstterry
GURU
GURU
Posts: 1532
Joined: Sat Jul 08, 2017 5:04 am
Location: Bulls Gap, TN
Has thanked: 429 times
Been thanked: 252 times

Re: Curbing Bad Behavior

Post by sstterry » Sat Oct 26, 2019 4:26 am

Welcome m_rachel! Listen to these folks, they know what they are talking about!

User avatar
OwnedByTheCow
Trail Boss
Trail Boss
Posts: 470
Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2014 5:22 pm
Location: Nowhere New Hampshire
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 32 times

Re: Curbing Bad Behavior

Post by OwnedByTheCow » Fri Nov 15, 2019 10:46 am

You have to be the tough guy first so that you can be the nice guy later. Smack him in the nose when he acts up. NOT on his poll. I try to tell people not to rub their poll area. That's a bad habit to learn.
As mentioned he's probably going to need a buddy. He's lonely. Having another buddy gives him competition to eat as well. He will eat more knowing that someone else is eating too.

Walk him EVERY SINGLE DAY. As long as there is no ice on the ground. Walk him when it's raining. Walk him when it's dark out too. Expose him to different scenarios. When I show, one fair may be in a lighted tent at night. Meaning that my cows have to get used to walking into a lighted area from a dark area. And vice versa. I always suggest picking up Temple Grandins book on livestock behavior. It give a lot of perspective for showmen to see about their animals.
Be decisive, wether right or wrong.
The road of life is paved with many flat squirrels who couldn't make a decision.

Post Reply