First time planting hay-grazer

Discuss grasses and how to grow and harvest them.
Texasmark
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Re: First time planting hay-grazer

Postby Texasmark » Sat Jul 21, 2018 7:49 am

Allenw wrote:
Texasmark wrote:
Allenw wrote:
Don't forget to test for nitrates before feeding.


Nitrates usually aren't a problem in baled hay as they and prussic acid dissipate over time. Been feeding it 30+ years and never had a problem. Grazing, be careful.


Nitrates don't dissipate, I agree they usually aren't a problem. A lot depends on how a person feeds the hay. A person feeding a few cubes everyday or the cows having access to other forage can cut the total nitrate intake. The poor sucker that dumps a high nitrate bale to a bunch of snow bound cattle is the one that gets hurt. Being in a drought year I would check it just to be sure.


That's what makes for news articles. Checking your references, there are all types of folks and conditions when doing anything including haying, fertilization methods/quantities, harvesting techniques, and mother nature.

Most of my blabbing is via personal experiences which are moderate to mild considering the extremes of the above available to the general public.

I had a well to do friend with a field of Fescue (I think it was) he had way over fertilized. Nothing in the field but that grass (at a good stand by then), but salt and water. Turned in a bunch of hungry, six month old (thereabouts) calves in it and lost quite a few before he got the rest out. I don't remember the story exactly as it's been 20ish years ago but the point is, excess fertilization and no diversification as to the available nutrition can cause problems.

Thanks for the tip.
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Texasmark
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Re: First time planting hay-grazer

Postby Texasmark » Sat Jul 21, 2018 11:35 am

Texasmark wrote:
Allenw wrote:
Texasmark wrote:
Nitrates usually aren't a problem in baled hay as they and prussic acid dissipate over time. Been feeding it 30+ years and never had a problem. Grazing, be careful.


Nitrates don't dissipate, I agree they usually aren't a problem. A lot depends on how a person feeds the hay. A person feeding a few cubes everyday or the cows having access to other forage can cut the total nitrate intake. The poor sucker that dumps a high nitrate bale to a bunch of snow bound cattle is the one that gets hurt. Being in a drought year I would check it just to be sure.


That's what makes for news articles. Checking your references, there are all types of folks and conditions when doing anything including haying, fertilization methods/quantities, harvesting techniques, and mother nature.

Most of my blabbing is via personal experiences which are moderate to mild considering the extremes of the above available to the general public.

I had a well to do friend with a field of Fescue (I think it was) he had way over fertilized. Nothing in the field but that grass (at a good stand by then), but salt and water. Turned in a bunch of hungry, six month old (thereabouts) calves in it and lost quite a few before he got the rest out. I don't remember the story exactly as it's been 20ish years ago but the point is, excess fertilization and no diversification as to the available nutrition can cause problems.

Thanks for the tip.


Here's an example of why problems occur and why I don't have such (opinion):

From "https://efotg.sc.egov.usda.gov/references/public/LA/AGRONOMY_TECHNICAL_NOTE_NO99-Common_Fertilizers_and_Ammonium_Nitrate_Alternatives.pdf":

"Hay producers using 300 lbs/ac of actual nitrogen from the urea/ammonium sulfate blend will be neutralizing 861 lbs of lime per acre per year. After 3 years..............." This is apparently for a person with PH problems but still, if he's growing/baling crops and ruminants are eating them............

If I get 60# at 21-0-0-24 (Ammonium Sulphate.....for acid soils) I'm pushing it in good years. More like 20#. Or may mix with 16-16-16-? Sulphate and Urea+P+K+S being sulphate with the Urea, at 200#/ac in a good year.

Other thing herein "http://agrilifecdn.tamu.edu/coastalbend/files/2016/06/PUB_forage_Nitrates-and-Prussic-Acid-in-Forages.pdf" is Sulphate vs Nitrate types of ammonia.

I mean folks if the millions and millons of pounds of beef produced annually had a problem with nitrates, not just some isolated examples making the news, I wouldn't be typing this and you wouldn't be reading it........you can throw GMO nutrition in that pot and stir it too.
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AZAggie
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Re: First time planting hay-grazer

Postby AZAggie » Thu Sep 06, 2018 4:08 pm

My hay-grazer didn't turn out as well as I had expected. I am positive that field needs some TLC. Prior to my parents moving back to OK, it had basically sat unused for 10-15 years. I have taken a soil sample and am waiting on it to come back. My Dad had planted rye there last year and it didn't do diddly, I thought mainly because it didn't rain for 6 months here last fall-spring. However, while doing my soil sampling, I discovered that once you get about 3-5 inches down, the ground is hard is concrete. The roots can't penetrate that hard ground. I ran a disc over it before I put the hay-grazer in, but I really didn't realize the ground was that compacted. I never thought that soil that sandy could get that hard.
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Allenw
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Re: First time planting hay-grazer

Postby Allenw » Thu Sep 06, 2018 6:55 pm

Finally put mine up


Image

I had a different variety a half mile away that the sugar cane aphids tore up, we have cows on it.
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