Truly Amazing Pasture

Discuss grasses and how to grow and harvest them.
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Jeanne - Simme Valley
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Re: Truly Amazing Pasture

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Fri Jun 29, 2018 11:28 am

TexasBred wrote:
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:ddd - you are correct on this one. Feed-thru fly control kills dung beetles - the best bug a farmer can have.


The Altosid folks would disagree with you Jeanne:

Residual insecticides, such as organophosphates, are toxic to beneficial insects, such as coprophagous flies and beetles, predaceous beetles, parasitic wasps and dung beetles. Altosid® IGR does not disrupt dung composition and does not harm beneficial insects.

It doesn't even kill flies. Simply allows the eggs to hatch and development of the larvae ceases.

I stand corrected then. Did not know that. I had a "specialist" come out for a meeting and we played in manure piles, checking for fly larvae and dung beetles. He found the beetles, but no fly larvae. He set a fly trap but didn't catch any. :banana: I must be behind times. Sorry for the wrong info.
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kickinbull
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Re: Truly Amazing Pasture

Postby kickinbull » Fri Jun 29, 2018 3:06 pm

kickinbull wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:I got about 80 acres that look like this. I don't fertilize. The rain, Kentucky soil, and wood elves is what creates it. Plus, a regular mowing program. Mowing makes forage!
Image

Would you define/explain your “ regular mowing program “?
When I first started farming I visited one my uncles that is a rancher in Missouri. I was interested in his operation so I asked a lot of questions. One that his answer stuck with me was about acres per cow. He ran 1 cow unit per 5 acres. Plenty of grass most years. He stocked for drought and mowed the excesses.
Big mistake on my part. 1 cow/5acres.
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Logan52
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Re: Truly Amazing Pasture

Postby Logan52 » Fri Jun 29, 2018 4:56 pm

The pastures I can get over to mow regularly have not had seed, fertilizer, lime or herbicide for at least 50 years and today are a mix of fescue, bluegrass, white clover, red clover and lespedeza (with a pretty good stand of ironweed). They are at least as good and maybe better than they were 50 years ago. The rougher and steeper parts of the same pastures (that I only mow once a year or less) are a jungle of sumac, goldenrod, briars, honeysuckle and fescue.
I do treat hayfields a lot better ( fertilizer-lime-reseeding) and am understocked on the pastures. My old truck and trailer could not handle matching the number of stock to the forage so I keep numbers down.
When I started on this farm nearly 50 years ago the old-timer neighbors told me that mowing makes grass. I bought a used bush-hog from one of them and took his advice to heart.
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herofan
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Re: Truly Amazing Pasture

Postby herofan » Sat Jun 30, 2018 2:41 pm

ddd75 wrote:
herofan wrote:
True Grit Farms wrote:The fact is cows don't eat where they pooped and then the grass gets tall and tough and they won't eat it. I rotary mow and chain drag my pastures a few times every year. I think a mowed - dragged pasture looks good and it's my time and money that I'm wasting.


If a cow pie is left alone, how long before it decomposes to the point they will eat in that area again?


within a few days mine are gone. I usually run my cows back on the same pasture every 12-15 days.



Wow. That’s amazing. I’m sure it takes several months here for a pie to completely disappear. Is it dung beetles, climate, or both that cause yours to disappear so quickly?
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ClinchValley
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Re: Truly Amazing Pasture

Postby ClinchValley » Sat Jun 30, 2018 3:37 pm

Healthy soil has a whole lot to do with decomposition.
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Lemme pick your brain. :cowboy:

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Jeanne - Simme Valley
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Re: Truly Amazing Pasture

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Sat Jun 30, 2018 5:49 pm

Mine do not disappear quickly. Guess I don't have enough dung Beatles.
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Re: Truly Amazing Pasture

Postby ddd75 » Sun Jul 01, 2018 6:20 am

herofan wrote:
ddd75 wrote:
herofan wrote:
If a cow pie is left alone, how long before it decomposes to the point they will eat in that area again?


within a few days mine are gone. I usually run my cows back on the same pasture every 12-15 days.



Wow. That’s amazing. I’m sure it takes several months here for a pie to completely disappear. Is it dung beetles, climate, or both that cause yours to disappear so quickly?



heavy rotations are a big part, but insects are key.

dung beetles are small little shiny beetles that are pretty quick.

Image


With heavy rotations, I can move them that morning, and only see a few manure piles. everything else has been trampled. the insects are already devouring the remaining piles. the next day they are gone. If the rotation is not as heavy, they will stay for up to a week but are gone within that time. Every manure pile has at least 3 nightcrawlers in them.


I am running 2 cows to the acre right now.
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