Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Discuss grasses and how to grow and harvest them.
hillbilly beef man
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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by hillbilly beef man » Sat Nov 24, 2018 2:50 am

kenny thomas wrote:
Ebenezer wrote:The pastures of today were hardwoods of yesterday. Funny that environmentalists never worry about what their house displaced, what their resort disrupted, what their trail bothers. The problem is always others.

Talk about hardwood changes in the east- talk about chestnuts.

In VA there are more acres of timberland now than in 1940. Many of the steep mountain farms are now in trees.
Yes the biggest impact on the eastern forest was the chestnut blight. Its a different forest but it's still forest land.


It is kind of sad to ride the back roads and see what is now timber what was clean pasture when I was a kid. The days of keeping steep pasture clean with a size are long gone. Most pasture that is too steep for a 4wd tractor has grown up (my own place included). But it is amazing how quick a place will grow up in poplar.


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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by kenny thomas » Sat Nov 24, 2018 5:45 am

hillbilly beef man wrote:
kenny thomas wrote:
Ebenezer wrote:The pastures of today were hardwoods of yesterday. Funny that environmentalists never worry about what their house displaced, what their resort disrupted, what their trail bothers. The problem is always others.

Talk about hardwood changes in the east- talk about chestnuts.

In VA there are more acres of timberland now than in 1940. Many of the steep mountain farms are now in trees.
Yes the biggest impact on the eastern forest was the chestnut blight. Its a different forest but it's still forest land.


It is kind of sad to ride the back roads and see what is now timber what was clean pasture when I was a kid. The days of keeping steep pasture clean with a size are long gone. Most pasture that is too steep for a 4wd tractor has grown up (my own place included). But it is amazing how quick a place will grow up in poplar.

It's very much the same way hrre. The yellow poplar is actually making you more money long term than the grass would have on the steep land.
My thoughts only, don't bet the farm on them. KT

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by sstterry » Sat Nov 24, 2018 5:26 pm

kenny thomas wrote: It's very much the same way hrre. The yellow poplar is actually making you more money long term than the grass would have on the steep land.



How much are small to medium Cedars worth?? Asking for a friend...... :roll:

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by kenny thomas » Sat Nov 24, 2018 8:23 pm

Gotta be over 8" on the small end and 9ft I think. Cedar is measured in a cedar scale but last I heard was about $400 a thousand delivered. Some haul it as pulpwood to KY to make dog bedding. Last year it was $90 a ton delivered.
My thoughts only, don't bet the farm on them. KT

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by ddd75 » Sun Nov 25, 2018 5:51 am

hillbilly beef man wrote:
kenny thomas wrote:
Ebenezer wrote:The pastures of today were hardwoods of yesterday. Funny that environmentalists never worry about what their house displaced, what their resort disrupted, what their trail bothers. The problem is always others.

Talk about hardwood changes in the east- talk about chestnuts.

In VA there are more acres of timberland now than in 1940. Many of the steep mountain farms are now in trees.
Yes the biggest impact on the eastern forest was the chestnut blight. Its a different forest but it's still forest land.


It is kind of sad to ride the back roads and see what is now timber what was clean pasture when I was a kid. The days of keeping steep pasture clean with a size are long gone. Most pasture that is too steep for a 4wd tractor has grown up (my own place included). But it is amazing how quick a place will grow up in poplar.



yea i used to cut all mine (try) with a weedeater. talk about long days and nothing getting done.

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by Stocker Steve » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:13 am

kenny thomas wrote:The yellow poplar is actually making you more money long term than the grass would have on the steep land.


What is it used for?
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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by ddd75 » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:31 am

Stocker Steve wrote:
kenny thomas wrote:The yellow poplar is actually making you more money long term than the grass would have on the steep land.


What is it used for?


lumber

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by Texasmark » Sun Nov 25, 2018 7:03 am

Hackberry, Cedar of several varieties, and White Ash are natives here. If you don't keep your land mowed or plowed you are going to get it covered in one or the other; Cedar predominantly. Ash like to get their feet wet. Hackberries don't care. Hackberries want to be a bush rather than a tree but if you spend a little time when young, they make really nice shade and fire wood.....but both Ash and Hackberry burn faster than Oak which comes from up on the Red River where the soil is acid, not alkaline like here.

I had one Cottonwood on the place and as soon as I found out what it was the axe it got; a transplant thanks to the wind and a 50' a neighbor had right next to his trailer house, many years old..........

Bought 5 ea. healthy, balled in burlap, 2" Live Oak saplings 30ish years ago. 3 died off within the first couple of years. One of the two is doing ok, the other anemic. Waiting for it to turn into fire wood any day.

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by greybeard » Sun Nov 25, 2018 7:56 am

but if you spend a little time when young, they make really nice shade

Wanna buy some Tallow trees? They make good shade, grow quick, and I can pull 'em up easy in the wet soil I have right now.......special deal just for CT folks :tiphat: . :hide: :hide:
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