miracle calf

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Re: miracle calf

Postby Nite Hawk » Fri Jul 06, 2018 10:44 am

The birth was rough, and she had never had a calf before, so it took 20-minutes-3/4 of an hour, but she rose to the occasion and is "in love" and watches her calf well.
I had a goat years ago that never really accepted her babies the first time around, and only let the buck nurse because it hurts when so full. Both babies died & I was not happy.
She never ever did that again and was "right as rain" as long as I had her she took very good care of her kids every time., and that was a number of years.. I put it down to being young and stupid...
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Nesikep » Fri Jul 06, 2018 10:51 am

Mine
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Nite Hawk » Sat Jul 07, 2018 12:20 am

yeah, the one Piedmontese cow licked the "twist" of her calf so much she literally removed a fair amount of the hair.. not joking..
She hasn't been that determined this year, which is good..
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Sat Jul 07, 2018 10:09 am

Glad everything worked out well. Always such a relief to realize you have a live calf!!! Wahoo!
Lesson learned. A heifer should be grown out well BEFORE she is bred. But, if not, you are better off feeding her & growing her. The little added weight on a calf is not as hard at calving time as much as a heifer not grown out to her potential. If you expect her to calve as a baby (which is what we are doing calving at 2 years old - I do all the time), you need to give her the nutrition for her to fully utilize her potential of growth. Feed more energy (like corn) than protein. I am NOT saying get her fat. I am saying, feed her to grow natural - and that takes proper nutrition. Much easier to get them where they need to be BEFORE they are bred. Then, good quality grass hay keeps them in good shape.
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Nite Hawk » Sat Jul 07, 2018 11:01 pm

Nesikep-- you must have tasted good!! LOL She looks like she has a bit of limo in her?
Jeanne - Simme Valley-- when it comes to feeding cattle -the feed specialist at the co-op recommends high protein to grow them and then switch to a higher starch to fatten...
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Nesikep » Sun Jul 08, 2018 1:44 am

Nite Hawk wrote:Nesikep-- you must have tasted good!! LOL She looks like she has a bit of limo in her?
Jeanne - Simme Valley-- when it comes to feeding cattle -the feed specialist at the co-op recommends high protein to grow them and then switch to a higher starch to fatten...

Yes, she's half Limo, then Gelbvieh, Shorthorn, Saler and Hereford way back.. She's raising that calf well, wish she'd hold a little more condition though
Her mother loves chewing on my arm.. Apple doesn't fall far from the tree they say.. you can see her as a calf here too
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Re: miracle calf

Postby lithuanian farmer » Sun Jul 08, 2018 6:07 am

Glad to see everything turned out well.
Many years ago, had one heifer which had a very hard time delivering her first calf, even with assistance. She never took a glance to the calf. She did a fine job with the next calf, been a good mom. And even would "insist" she needs some help if you are near when she's calving. She would lie down next to you asking for a help, even if it's a small calf and she can do it easily herself.
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Sun Jul 08, 2018 6:11 am

Nite Hawk wrote:Nesikep-- you must have tasted good!! LOL She looks like she has a bit of limo in her?
Jeanne - Simme Valley-- when it comes to feeding cattle -the feed specialist at the co-op recommends high protein to grow them and then switch to a higher starch to fatten...

Correct- a sucking age calf needs high protein which they are getting from Mom's milk. When they are weaned at 6-8 months of age, they should get around 14-15% protein through maybe 800-900#. (TexasBred is our expert now that I don't have hubby around.) After that, 12-14% is a good growing ration.
You need STARCH/ carbs to FATTEN for finish. You never want to fatten a heifer.
Your feed specialist is absolutely correct. But, you are not finishing/fattening your weaned heifers prior to breeding.
I am guessing?? your breed should weigh at least 800-850# at breeding time and be about 1100# at calving.
What does she weigh now?
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Chris H » Sun Jul 08, 2018 1:29 pm

Definitely a miracle calf! Usually a head back indicates the calf is already dead. They need to help get their heads up in place, too. Pushing the calf back gave it enough room to get its head up. I figure any pull where the heifer gets on her feet is not too bad. I'd keep her.
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Silver » Sun Jul 08, 2018 3:40 pm

Sometimes their heads are straight down between their front legs, and it can be pretty confusing at first. That head can be down there a long ways, and hard to reach.
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Nite Hawk » Sun Jul 08, 2018 5:13 pm

We checked for head down between the legs, wasn't there, and the heifer had "sucked" the calf back in several times, once the feet actually disappeared, still no head.
Last fall she weighed in before breeding If I remember right about 850 # or 880# thereabouts,
she hasn't been on a scale since..
No she hasn't been on a "fattening" diet, if you can "fatten" a piedmontese very much. They can put on a bit, but basically they are a lean muscled breed. When you look at them what you usually see is muscling under the skin over the ribs.
And agreed you may want to "condition" a heifer, but not "fatten" if you know what I mean. I have seen 4-H heifer sooo incredibly fat they have huge ROLLS of fat around the tail head. Sometimes I just shake my head when the judges place these OBESE heifer first or at the top of the class. There has been the odd judge that has "docked" OBESE heifers in 4-H shows, but it is not common.
Not good for breeding or calving, or for the udder. You want milk tissue in there, not fat.
Nesikep that is definitely a "licky" cow.. Better than a "kicky" cow! LOL
I would still watch those teeth, they have some razor sharp teeth in there even if they are not being mean. Had one cow that one of the family was feeding, and I warned them to watch the teeth. I knew from experience they have some sharp ones further back in there. The cow was NOT being mean, don't think she had a mean bone in her body, was just trying to bite down on the "goodie" and it was a nasty bite...
Its nice to see a calm gentle friendly animal and it seems that calmness is being passed to her calf as well.
It sure is easier to work on an animal if she is calm and not fighting you..
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Nesikep » Sun Jul 08, 2018 5:23 pm

There's a reason I only let her take my arm in sideways.. she can't get it back far enough to the big teeth! Yes, definitely better licky than kicky!.. I have milked her a few times, and she's raising her orphan brother this year and doing a pretty good job of it too... Didn't even have to fight her to get her to adopt him which is nice!.. The only downside is her own heifer calf (I'm short on heifers this year) isn't going to be up to weight.. Oh well.
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Nite Hawk » Fri Jul 13, 2018 12:16 am

Well calf is doing good, momma was doing good, but now I think she has a slight case of metritis so guess will have to put her on some anti-biotics.. Seems very very slight..
been so long since I have had that problem I am trying to remember what I used.. I do have some penicillin in there...
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Nesikep » Fri Jul 13, 2018 1:16 am

as long as she's got good appetite I've been told to hold off.. I usually use LA200 and can also do a uterine lavage.


I wanna see some pictures :)
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Jeanne - Simme Valley
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Re: miracle calf

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Fri Jul 13, 2018 5:13 am

If she is having some thick milky discharge, and she is otherwise acting healthy, I would just give her a lutalyse shot at 10-14 days post calving. That will help her clean out.
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