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Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Fri Jul 24, 2020 1:06 pm
by hurleyjd
In 1946 or 1947 My Father and two of his brothers cut and baled a hay meadow owned by their Sister Lil Osborn. I will try to explain the operation as follows. Uncle Carl cut the meadow with a horse drawn sickle mower with a four foot bar. After the hay was cured they borrowed a baler that was powered by a horse. The transport wheels were taken off and the baler set on the ground it was maybe forty or fifty foot long on the ground. Set up in shade for evening work. The horse walked in a circle at the far end of the baler opposite of where the hay was fed in walking in a circle pulling a lever that powered a bell crank that moved the plunger head back and forth. There were wooden blocks made with grooves that wire were fed through to tie the bales. A block was placed between each bale. The bale hooks in the baler would catch the block and keep everything from backing up. My Uncle Earl drug the hay to the baler with a sulky rake and My Father and Uncle Carl fed the baler with pitch forks.The wire being used was in a long bundle and place along side and inline with the baler. My cousin Ladale Hurley would poke a wire through the backside of the block that divided the bale and when the next block showed up that divided the bales I would poke the wire back through on the front side of the block and Ladale would tie the bale off. Two wires for each bale. My Father paid me a penny a bale for my work. I made $7 that summer and bought a pair of Yellow Acme cowboy boots. My older Brother Cecil drug the bales and stacked them away from the operation and kept the horse walking. Each brother divided the bales equally. I can remember this as it was yesterday sure wish my mother would have taken a photo with her Kodak for history's sake.

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Sat Jul 25, 2020 10:43 am
by greybeard
Farm connected pulmonary fibrosis and other interstitial lung diseases used to be called thresher's lung or thresher's disease..

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Sat Jul 25, 2020 11:03 am
by callmefence
greybeard wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 10:43 am
Farm connected pulmonary fibrosis and other interstitial lung diseases used to be called thresher's lung or thresher's disease..
A mask would help with that.

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Sat Jul 25, 2020 12:21 pm
by Nesikep
I had two friends that passed away a few years ago that were walking encyclopedias.. Neal Wright in particular was interesting to talk to, usually stopped in at his place on my way home from town for a coffee and chat.. never got out of there before 3 or 4 hours had passed Image
pic share

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Sat Jul 25, 2020 6:30 pm
by ccr
Those are some serious machines there.

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Sun Jul 26, 2020 12:36 am
by greybeard
callmefence wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 11:03 am
greybeard wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 10:43 am
Farm connected pulmonary fibrosis and other interstitial lung diseases used to be called thresher's lung or thresher's disease..
A mask would help with that.
In those days, about all they had was bandanas.
My brother-in-law died from pulmonary fibrosis back in May...not farm related tho. Not an easy way to go and it took 5 years to kill him.....slowly, gasping for every breath. Chem inhalation from a refinery over in Deer Park Tx and agent orange exposure in RVN before that.

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Sun Jul 26, 2020 5:47 am
by jltrent
Nesikep wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 12:21 pm
I had two friends that passed away a few years ago that were walking encyclopedias.. Neal Wright in particular was interesting to talk to, usually stopped in at his place on my way home from town for a coffee and chat.. never got out of there before 3 or 4 hours had passed Image
pic share
That guy had a strong back.

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Sun Jul 26, 2020 9:58 pm
by Nesikep
jltrent wrote:
Sun Jul 26, 2020 5:47 am
Nesikep wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 12:21 pm
I had two friends that passed away a few years ago that were walking encyclopedias.. Neal Wright in particular was interesting to talk to, usually stopped in at his place on my way home from town for a coffee and chat.. never got out of there before 3 or 4 hours had passed Image
pic share
That guy had a strong back.
yes.. HAD!

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Sun Jul 26, 2020 11:50 pm
by Dave
Nesikep wrote:
Sun Jul 26, 2020 9:58 pm
jltrent wrote:
Sun Jul 26, 2020 5:47 am
Nesikep wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 12:21 pm
I had two friends that passed away a few years ago that were walking encyclopedias.. Neal Wright in particular was interesting to talk to, usually stopped in at his place on my way home from town for a coffee and chat.. never got out of there before 3 or 4 hours had passed Image
pic share
That guy had a strong back.
yes.. HAD!
The old Distans and Mauls were from before my time. The old boys told me when they got them they threw away their crosscut saws. Pick up an 090 Stihl with a 60 inch bar sometime. I don't know about the strong back but I think you were weak between the ears to be packing one of those around to make a living. I remember when the 075 came out that I thought they were a pleasure to run. Only weighed 36 pounds empty with no bar.

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Sun Jul 26, 2020 11:59 pm
by Nesikep
Dave wrote:
Sun Jul 26, 2020 11:50 pm
Nesikep wrote:
Sun Jul 26, 2020 9:58 pm
jltrent wrote:
Sun Jul 26, 2020 5:47 am

That guy had a strong back.
yes.. HAD!
The old Distans and Mauls were from before my time. The old boys told me when they got them they threw away their crosscut saws. Pick up an 090 Stihl with a 60 inch bar sometime. I don't know about the strong back but I think you were weak between the ears to be packing one of those around to make a living. I remember when the 075 came out that I thought they were a pleasure to run. Only weighed 36 pounds empty with no bar.
About as much saw as I wanna run is a 394 or 064.. I have a 2100 with a 36" 404 bar if a really need to get through something big, the 394 has a 34" and the 064 has a 32".. the 044 and 372 both have 28" which is a nice size
If I could find a 3120 I'd just have to buy it

I'm kinda kicking myself for not buying this one... Not only is it exceedingly rare, it's doubly so because it's pretty much new in crate!
It's a Comet diesel powered saw
No, I would not be running it
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Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2020 10:31 am
by Dave
Some of those old saws like the Distans and Mauls couldn't be tipped on there side. So they were made so you could turn the bar while keeping the motor upright. To say that would be a pain is an understatement. But I guess it was easier than pulling on a crosscut all day.

I ran the guts out of a pair of 2100's with 36 inch bar working in SE Alaska. They were a good fit for the size of timber. They were lighter than a 075 and the next step down in a Stihl was a 045. I believe that was before the 056 came out. I still have the 066 with a 36 inch bar that was in my hands when I got my back broke. Every time i pick it up I can't imagine that I use to run up and down the hills with it in my hands. I guess that is why I drank a full gallon of water everyday at work. I was younger and in a whole lot better shape in those days.

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2020 2:49 pm
by Nesikep
I never liked the 056, it really felt like a cinderblock.. the 064/066's were shaped like a husky and much better
Lots of old 2100's around here, they were really good saws but yeah, on the heavy side too

Re: Name the Machine

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 8:52 pm
by Dave
I saw this old threshing machine a couple days ago. I wonder why they had one. There can't be 5 acres of land flat enough to farm. This country is flat as a table top... with the legs cut off on one side. From the looks of the old house this must have been a successful homestead at one time. Not the normal little shack you find up in these hills.


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