Broadway

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of your favorite breed.

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Jeanne - Simme Valley
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Re: Broadway

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Tue Jun 19, 2018 4:07 pm

The bull as my Avatar is a 5.3 frame, 2300#, calving ease trait leader.
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elkwc
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Re: Broadway

Postby elkwc » Tue Jun 19, 2018 4:17 pm

Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:elkwc - Do you consider a frame 5, heavy muscled bull a larger frame? or moderate?
When I refer to moderate, I am generally talking about height.
I consider a frame 5 heavy muscled bull low moderate. I call moderate around a frame 5.5-6.0. The feeder buyers here want at least a frame 5.0 steer but prefer one 5.5 or a little over. The good steers that are frame 5.0 still get a little dock at times. I have seen moderate to refer to frame size and also muscling. I'm a little concerned with the bull I bought this year. If his calves have enough frame size I think he will work ok. But he is likely to mature a little less frame size than I prefer. Hopefully on the larger cows he will work well and leave us with some good females for the future.
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Jeanne - Simme Valley
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Re: Broadway

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Tue Jun 19, 2018 4:29 pm

I consider my cowherd moderate in size. Smallest may be a 5 (couple), largest might be a 7, but majority should hit between 5.5 and 6.5. I did have mostly 7-9 frame cows. I was paid good money for weaned heifers in that frame size. When the show circuit smartened up and wanted a more easy doing animal, it was real EASY to get them "moderate" and keep the structural soundness we worked so hard to have with that huge frame. You can say I sorta go with the fad - to a degree. They wanted them tall. I was able to make them tall, but they still had to be big barreled cows that survived on hay and grass.
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elkwc
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Re: Broadway

Postby elkwc » Tue Jun 19, 2018 7:43 pm

Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:I consider my cowherd moderate in size. Smallest may be a 5 (couple), largest might be a 7, but majority should hit between 5.5 and 6.5. I did have mostly 7-9 frame cows. I was paid good money for weaned heifers in that frame size. When the show circuit smartened up and wanted a more easy doing animal, it was real EASY to get them "moderate" and keep the structural soundness we worked so hard to have with that huge frame. You can say I sorta go with the fad - to a degree. They wanted them tall. I was able to make them tall, but they still had to be big barreled cows that survived on hay and grass.


Jeanne your cattle are in the size range I prefer. The issue here has been getting the muscling and frame size a person wants and not give up something else. The BW rage in Angus and even some Herefords hurt them. They gave up muscling, structural soundness and frame size to reach it. Many Herefords have added muscling but have moderated too much. Many of the PB breeders feel a 1,250-1,300 lb cow is big enough. And when trying to use those two breeds it has been hard to find what I desire in the price range I feel I can afford for a bull. My current cows range from an upper 4 frame to at least a 7 frame Angus cow. She might be a little more. The common denominator on mine is they do well on grass and breed back quick when exposed. All udders are good to functional. And it seems that this year will be another year where I have more bull calves. And the other requirement is docility. We pulled in the pasture where I had 2 bulls Sunday and loaded a yearling bull that has never been haltered by backing the trailer in a corner and taking the feed bucket and he went in. The only problem was I got 15 more I had to let back. Was moving him to breed heifers. With me being over 65 and her 75 being easy to handle is as important as anything.
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Jeanne - Simme Valley
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Re: Broadway

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Tue Jun 19, 2018 8:40 pm

I totally understand needing the cattle docile. I, also, am up there in age (71), but no matter what age, life is much more pleasant when you don't have to run after them or watch your back. I have culled/shipped some real high pedigree good looking cows because I could not trust them after they were turned out with their calf. If a cow is defensive while she is penned up with her newborn, that's fine. She's being a mom, but when I open the gate & turn her out, she best not look at me cross-eyed or she becomes someones lunch.
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Simme Valley of New York - http://www.SimmeValley.com
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we make a life by what we give."

elkwc
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Re: Broadway

Postby elkwc » Tue Jun 19, 2018 9:56 pm

Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:I totally understand needing the cattle docile. I, also, am up there in age (71), but no matter what age, life is much more pleasant when you don't have to run after them or watch your back. I have culled/shipped some real high pedigree good looking cows because I could not trust them after they were turned out with their calf. If a cow is defensive while she is penned up with her newborn, that's fine. She's being a mom, but when I open the gate & turn her out, she best not look at me cross-eyed or she becomes someones lunch.


We are much alike in our preferences for cattle. I had the chance to buy 3 different Hereford bulls a year ago that were very good. In one instance there was 2 left out of 28 yearlings and then some fall weanlings in with them. They looked very good from the road so wondered why they hadn't sold. As soon as I walked in them small pasture they went to the other side while the weanlings continued to eat grass. I just turned around and left. The same with the other one. All 3 were very good bulls but there was a reason they hadn't sold. And to us structural soundness and docility are 2 things we look at first. I like a cow that is a caretaker as we have coyote issues here. But don't want one that is hard to handle or will get you after the calf is a few weeks old. The old Brangus cows she had and still has two were very defensive when they had calves. One whose daughter we have butted the grill guard on the feed pu on time when she thought we were getting too close. But after 7-10 days she would bring her baby up and was easy to handle. Never had to worry about her calf being coyote dinner.
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