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Re: Idaman

Posted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:05 pm
by DOC HARRIS
KMacGinley wrote:
jhambley wrote:
I had a Deewall bull on the place last night for about 15 min


I'm sure KMac will post his own photos as soon as the bull has a chance to recover from the trip. In the mean time, Jane Deewall asked that I help her post a photo of KMac's D Advance 806 bull. He just turned two.

Image


I am back from Kansas and yes, back in the Hereford business. :) I have two Jerry Hambley horned hereford cows and a Cooksley polled cow. In the next few years, we will be turning out some baldies of Ohlde and Deewall breeding and growing our Hereford herd, which would go a lot faster if Deewalls ever have heifers for sale. :)

I know that Jane and Mike are reading this thread, so I want to thank you for the bull, and Lynn really thanks you for the Lemon Bread, which she appreciated much more than the bull. :) Mike and Jane are some great people and did what they said they were going to do, which I really appreciate.

Tim Ohlde really liked him, as he spent a couple of days there in the barn. The bull has a great disposition and I think was greatly appreciated by all who viewed him.

Got to see Julian's Red angus cattle. Wow! Great red angus, if you are looking for the red's you need to check them out!

Hauled home 3 angus bulls from the sale for people in Indiana and Illinois, had to get the Hereford off the trailer to transfer one of the bulls and did it at Gary Kaper's. When that Horned bull came off the trailer, I think I heard all of the Shorthorn bulls flee from the barn, but it was dark, so I couldn't really tell. :)


Mac-

What is the Frame Score on the Hereford Bull? . . .and..was he just beginning to take a step with his right front foot when the picture was taken?

He looks spectacular - especially when you consider how he will nick with your Ohlde cows to produce Black Baldies!

DOC HARRIS

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 12:31 am
by Ned Jr.
Idaman wrote:Image

Churn Creek Grasslands

Do you still own this ranch? Sure looks like some BIG rough country. What in the world did you do with One hundred and thirty five Thooouuusand acres??

Here's a link to part of your old ranch here in the valley.
http://www.maytagmountainranch.com/

Sure enjoying the stories. Franklin Nash must of had a great personality. A lot of men would have just got mad over the hay in the out house. Instead you got a good chuckle putting the hay in the out house, Franklin got a chuckle sending you a picture of soiled long johns. Now I'm getting a chuckle picturing Franklin walking around JC Penny in Canon looking for the perfect pair of long johns for the photo just for a good laugh :D

What part of south eastern Colorado are you thinking on moving to?

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 8:05 am
by Idaman
Ned Jr. wrote:
Idaman wrote:Image

Churn Creek Grasslands

Do you still own this ranch? Sure looks like some BIG rough country. What in the world did you do with One hundred and thirty five Thooouuusand acres??

Here's a link to part of your old ranch here in the valley.
http://www.maytagmountainranch.com/

Sure enjoying the stories. Franklin Nash must of had a great personality. A lot of men would have just got mad over the hay in the out house. Instead you got a good chuckle putting the hay in the out house, Franklin got a chuckle sending you a picture of soiled long johns. Now I'm getting a chuckle picturing Franklin walking around JC Penny in Canon looking for the perfect pair of long johns for the photo just for a good laugh :D

What part of south eastern Colorado are you thinking on moving to?


Ned Jr. - We don't still own Empire it is now a provincial park and grasslands preserve.

East of Trinidad somewhere. No more BLM(see what Ferrington Carpenter hath wrought.) only deeded and the ability to winter out as you might appreciate coming from your area.

As to using the 325,000 acres, it was mostly covered with timber with scattered high mountain bog meadows and the bulk of the rest was open country along the Frazer River and Churn Creek. There was still 70,000 acres in that area. It was semi-arid with tons of blue bunch grass. I had this grass analysed one time to see if we needed supplements. It tested so low I gave up and used my old method. We actually owned just 28,000 acres of the best land in the lower elevations.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 8:54 am
by alacattleman
Idaman wrote:A big Idaho welcome to Julie Nash. You were young enough that we weren't well acquainted but there are some great stories on Franklins youngest daughter from the well of Franklin memories. Franklin was a serious subject but without seeing his humor and potential humor you missed a big part of the man.

Another area I have not touched on in regard to Franklin was his esperiences in WW2. We often talked at great length about those experiences and since I was serving in the ANG at the time(pre Nam) he obviously really wanted me to know where he was coming from. He was originally in the US army but after his first leave and trip to Australia he applied to be reassigned to the Australian Coast Watches. Their assignment was to hire local native fishermen and their boats and then spy on the Japanese and radio in their information every night. This meant that he was out there alone with the natives for literally a year at a time but sometimes only months as well. His partner was the man who picked up the crew of PT 109 of Kennedy fame. That was another part of their assignment, to pick up downed pilots and wrecked PT boat crews. They ate mostly turtle eggs and became quite proficient at their preparation. At times he said they could sit literally on the end of a Japanese runway on some island and count the planes coming in and departing. The Japanese never patrolled their perimeters so they were pretty safe. Franklin said that early in the war the US was able to crack the Japanese message code and they read all their encoded messages and the Japs never figured it out. He was over there in this position for several years I believe.


Here is where the story gets really controversial and this heresy may get me thrown off of CT. Franklin was assigned to a unit after the fighting had stopped that had a judge that was to decide the cases of the local natives in a sort of court. So with Franklins recent experience with the natives, the Judge asked Franklin to serve as a court investigator. In the course of those investigations it became evident that the major cause of the disputes was caused from the local native women complaining about the lack of mansculinity of their local men. Franklin said that the women had evolved into really large beauties. The men on the other hand had atrophied to the point they were almost steers. Franklin felt that the reason for this was the constant inbreeding of the natives with a closed population on those small islands. One of the main disputes was the practice of the women from one island kidnapping the men from another island for certain purposes and then holding them hostages.

In our conversations he said that the same was somewhat true in line breeding cattle. I agreed then and am more convinced now especially when I lived among the North Americam natives in small local reserves where you see all sorts of genetic abnormalities. We discussed this at a much more private level but that is not for CT posts.
sounds a whole lot like whats happening today, dont it :cowboy:

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 9:02 am
by Ned Jr.
Idaman wrote:East of Trinidad somewhere. No more BLM(see what Ferrington Carpenter hath wrought.) only deeded and the ability to winter out as you might appreciate coming from your area.


I would appreciate that, I'm sick of feeding cows. We are starting to green up a little now but it will still be awhile before we can turn out. We are suppose to get some more snow tonight. Snow sure beats the over 80mph winds we had last week.

I figured BC Canada would get more snow than we do??

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 9:49 am
by Idaman
No feeding is what motivates me today. Where we were in BC at the lower elevations there was vey little snow but our problem was ice. Some mornings we had to crawl to the horse barn to saddle our sharpshod horses to ride out. Ask our boy who got kicked by one of those horses that punctured his lung and bruised several other organs.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 10:39 am
by Northern Rancher
I always like visiting with Stan the cowboss from Douglas Lake-even those big ranches in God's country have their own sets of challenges. I haven't been to BC all that much but there is some good country for sure. Haven't been around too many kicking horses lately if you don't count chuckwagon horses. My cousin got kicked in the head in our barn and killed-it sure helped to get my kids attention about barn manners when I showed them the stall it happened in.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 11:10 am
by Kingfisher
Unfortunately I'm in the dark. (which ain't unusual either. :lol2: )[/quote]

That's because your an Aggie..................:) Peace.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 11:17 am
by TexasBred
Kingfisher wrote:Unfortunately I'm in the dark. (which ain't unusual either. :lol2: )


That's because your an Aggie..................:) Peace.[/quote]

Yet it took you almost 24 hours to think up that comment?? There are worse things than being an Aggie. Right now I can't think of any but I know there has to be. Give me a little while. ;-)

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 12:21 pm
by JHH
Keep it coming. I am really learning some and enjoying all this.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 12:47 pm
by BIZIN
IDAMAN...What size would your cows be with a calf at side? Frame wise? And what would they weigh do you think? So would your herd be similar to Deewalls?

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 1:02 pm
by Herefords.US
TexasBred wrote:
Kingfisher wrote:
TexasBred wrote:Unfortunately I'm in the dark. (which ain't unusual either. :lol2: )


That's because your an Aggie..................:) Peace.


Yet it took you almost 24 hours to think up that comment?? There are worse things than being an Aggie. Right now I can't think of any but I know there has to be. Give me a little while. ;-)


:lol: :lol: :lol:

Carl Martin was an Aggie too!

George

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 1:20 pm
by KMacGinley
Mac-

What is the Frame Score on the Hereford Bull? . . .and..was he just beginning to take a step with his right front foot when the picture was taken?

He looks spectacular - especially when you consider how he will nick with your Ohlde cows to produce Black Baldies!

DOC HARRIS[/quote]

Doc: Jane took that picture, so she should answer that question about the hoof. I would guess that he is a low 5 or high 4 frame.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 2:54 pm
by Julian
I had the opportunity to see this bull briefly Sunday and really appreciate the good depth of heal he has. There are a lot of cattle out there that would be better if they had his feet.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 2:57 pm
by Jeanne - Simme Valley
TexasBred wrote:
alacattleman wrote:
TexasBred wrote:Dang all of a sudden we're having an online family reunion.
pretty neat aint it :cowboy:


I reckon so if you're a hereford breeder or know any of these folks. Unfortunately I'm in the dark. (which ain't unusual either. :lol2: )

I too don't know any of these names, but I am totally enjoying the reading - from beginning to now.
It is amazing so many people on here know these breeders. Says a lot for their reputation.