Farm Labor Shortage

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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Farm Fence Solutions » Sun Jun 10, 2018 6:53 am

http://nfpinc.com/opportunities/jobs-available

We are the only house on a dead end road, but have 12,000 sows just over the hill. I have no idea how many pigs they have in our county, but the facility on our road is just for farrowing replacement gilts for their local farms. These folks are good neighbors, and the only trouble we've had out of them came from 4 all white local employees. Three of them were stealing truckloads of pigs in the night, and I caught them.....Which earned me freezer pork for life.....and one little basturd on dope that was beating the fire out of his ol lady in front of our house. The great majority of their help comes from central Mexico, and are college graduates here on a work visa. They have a high turnover from the locals, but the migrant workers stick with them and have been nothing but nice, and very respectful.
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Farm Fence Solutions » Sun Jun 10, 2018 6:55 am

Lucky wrote:
hurleyjd wrote:
True Grit Farms wrote:I see plenty of able bodies sitting on the porches in the projects. You know the same one's that despise illegals but vote left with them.


Not enough hog farms and farms near the projects. How do you come up with a solution to move the project people to the farms or the farms to the project.



I have to disagree. Every small town I have been to has at least one government assisted living complex. The town I live in has 4 and the population here is around 900. Granted not all of these people can work but most of them are perfectly able. One year the government built 12 houses for “poor” people that owned their own land but had no house or if the house was run down it would be removed. I guess this stuff is acceptable in todays world.

If I was down on my luck and the only available job was feeding hogs, well I guess I’d walk to work and feed hogs every day.



Exactly. Most of that housing is financed by the USDA. (I haven't researched that, but it says it on all the signs out front)
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Bright Raven » Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:21 am

Farm Fence Solutions wrote:http://nfpinc.com/opportunities/jobs-available

We are the only house on a dead end road, but have 12,000 sows just over the hill. I have no idea how many pigs they have in our county, but the facility on our road is just for farrowing replacement gilts for their local farms. These folks are good neighbors, and the only trouble we've had out of them came from 4 all white local employees. Three of them were stealing truckloads of pigs in the night, and I caught them.....Which earned me freezer pork for life.....and one little basturd on dope that was beating the fire out of his ol lady in front of our house. The great majority of their help comes from central Mexico, and are college graduates here on a work visa. They have a high turnover from the locals, but the migrant workers stick with them and have been nothing but nice, and very respectful.


I put my order in for my winter supply of round bales. There is a county farmer who does nothing but raise hay on about 400 acres. He uses mostly Mexican labor. The local farm labor is young white guys on drugs, un-skilled, unreliable, dishonest, etc. No wonder farmers here use Mexican labor.
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby callmefence » Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:20 am

Bright Raven wrote:
Farm Fence Solutions wrote:http://nfpinc.com/opportunities/jobs-available

We are the only house on a dead end road, but have 12,000 sows just over the hill. I have no idea how many pigs they have in our county, but the facility on our road is just for farrowing replacement gilts for their local farms. These folks are good neighbors, and the only trouble we've had out of them came from 4 all white local employees. Three of them were stealing truckloads of pigs in the night, and I caught them.....Which earned me freezer pork for life.....and one little basturd on dope that was beating the fire out of his ol lady in front of our house. The great majority of their help comes from central Mexico, and are college graduates here on a work visa. They have a high turnover from the locals, but the migrant workers stick with them and have been nothing but nice, and very respectful.


I put my order in for my winter supply of round bales. There is a county farmer who does nothing but raise hay on about 400 acres. He uses mostly Mexican labor. The local farm labor is young white guys on drugs, un-skilled, unreliable, dishonest, etc. No wonder farmers here use Mexican labor.



That's called kicking the can down the road. Make it were people have to work by not supporting them. Quit hiring cheap illegal labor, that as Soon as a half dozen get a truck and some tools become competition that you can't compete with because they fly under the radar and pay no taxes or insurance.
Me or farm fence either one would pay a very good living and give a company truck to the right employee. The work and the money is there to be made. The problem is folks don't won't any part of the work part.
That has to be fixed. Not complained about. Then hiring wets to stack your squares. Fixing it will take time and cause hardships. But imo it is a must to MAGA.
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Bright Raven » Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:27 am

callmefence wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
Farm Fence Solutions wrote:http://nfpinc.com/opportunities/jobs-available

We are the only house on a dead end road, but have 12,000 sows just over the hill. I have no idea how many pigs they have in our county, but the facility on our road is just for farrowing replacement gilts for their local farms. These folks are good neighbors, and the only trouble we've had out of them came from 4 all white local employees. Three of them were stealing truckloads of pigs in the night, and I caught them.....Which earned me freezer pork for life.....and one little basturd on dope that was beating the fire out of his ol lady in front of our house. The great majority of their help comes from central Mexico, and are college graduates here on a work visa. They have a high turnover from the locals, but the migrant workers stick with them and have been nothing but nice, and very respectful.


I put my order in for my winter supply of round bales. There is a county farmer who does nothing but raise hay on about 400 acres. He uses mostly Mexican labor. The local farm labor is young white guys on drugs, un-skilled, unreliable, dishonest, etc. No wonder farmers here use Mexican labor.



That's called kicking the can down the road. Make it were people have to work by not supporting them. Quit hiring cheap illegal labor, that as Soon as a half dozen get a truck and some tools become competition that you can't compete with because they fly under the radar and pay no taxes or insurance.
Me or farm fence either one would pay a very good living and give a company truck to the right employee. The work and the money is there to be made. The problem is folks don't won't any part of the work part.
That has to be fixed. Not complained about. Then hiring wets to stack your squares. Fixing it will take time and cause hardships. But imo it is a must to MAGA.


No debate from me. Just the facts, Just the facts. The young white guys here that fall through the screen - i.e., have no skills, no education, had lousy parents, etc - are not worth the trouble hiring.
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby True Grit Farms » Sun Jun 10, 2018 1:04 pm

callmefence wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
Farm Fence Solutions wrote:http://nfpinc.com/opportunities/jobs-available

We are the only house on a dead end road, but have 12,000 sows just over the hill. I have no idea how many pigs they have in our county, but the facility on our road is just for farrowing replacement gilts for their local farms. These folks are good neighbors, and the only trouble we've had out of them came from 4 all white local employees. Three of them were stealing truckloads of pigs in the night, and I caught them.....Which earned me freezer pork for life.....and one little basturd on dope that was beating the fire out of his ol lady in front of our house. The great majority of their help comes from central Mexico, and are college graduates here on a work visa. They have a high turnover from the locals, but the migrant workers stick with them and have been nothing but nice, and very respectful.


I put my order in for my winter supply of round bales. There is a county farmer who does nothing but raise hay on about 400 acres. He uses mostly Mexican labor. The local farm labor is young white guys on drugs, un-skilled, unreliable, dishonest, etc. No wonder farmers here use Mexican labor.



That's called kicking the can down the road. Make it were people have to work by not supporting them. Quit hiring cheap illegal labor, that as Soon as a half dozen get a truck and some tools become competition that you can't compete with because they fly under the radar and pay no taxes or insurance.
Me or farm fence either one would pay a very good living and give a company truck to the right employee. The work and the money is there to be made. The problem is folks don't won't any part of the work part.
That has to be fixed. Not complained about. Then hiring wets to stack your squares. Fixing it will take time and cause hardships. But imo it is a must to MAGA.


Fenceman, if it was easy everyone would do it. The only way to MAGA is by people doing right and not by hiring cheap illegal labor. I think I have illegals? that unload my boat at the fish house's, I always give the foreman that speaks English a $50 dollar tip. They seem to really appreciate it, I can't believe they call me the old man though.
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Till-Hill » Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:53 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
callmefence wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
I put my order in for my winter supply of round bales. There is a county farmer who does nothing but raise hay on about 400 acres. He uses mostly Mexican labor. The local farm labor is young white guys on drugs, un-skilled, unreliable, dishonest, etc. No wonder farmers here use Mexican labor.



That's called kicking the can down the road. Make it were people have to work by not supporting them. Quit hiring cheap illegal labor, that as Soon as a half dozen get a truck and some tools become competition that you can't compete with because they fly under the radar and pay no taxes or insurance.
Me or farm fence either one would pay a very good living and give a company truck to the right employee. The work and the money is there to be made. The problem is folks don't won't any part of the work part.
That has to be fixed. Not complained about. Then hiring wets to stack your squares. Fixing it will take time and cause hardships. But imo it is a must to MAGA.


No debate from me. Just the facts, Just the facts. The young white guys here that fall through the screen - i.e., have no skills, no education, had lousy parents, etc - are not worth the trouble hiring.
I'll add one more to your list. In my part of the country they hire Hispanic's because they are only ones willing to milk cows, pig chores, and any of them types of jobs. Farmers up here won't pay a guy what he is worth from what I see. Very few white guys stick around long. I've been on my current herdsman job for 18 years and I'm only 33. My uncle up the road has been at his dairy farm job for 20+ and I might be able to think of 1 other person. Most of these white kids don't leave just because they are going to college or don't want to work. They out grow the job and the money. $10 hour about all anyone will give you here. Can make that in an air condition building slinging burgers! There is also a mining/trucking company starting at $17, high school kid used to work for us is there. Making $24 after being there for a year. Cabela's few miles away paying $12-14, Walmart starts that high to. Hispanic workers are here to stay until farmers will pay more.
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby farmerjan » Sun Jun 10, 2018 3:15 pm

Part of the problem is there is no shame in being on the gov't tit. Too many are 2nd 3rd or even 4th generation now and to them it is a way of life. Why work when you don't have to? And why get "old" by the time you are 60 and your body is paying for all those hard working years? The men don't see any reason to kill themselves working, the women seem to not care if the man is a good provider by working a job, and they don't care about "getting ahead" or owning anything. And if they spread their legs and produce another one every year like an old broodmare....well they just get more money so why have a "man" except for the stud service, because it doesn't matter who or what he is.

There is no pride in a great number of these younger people who make up the next generation of what used to be considered our up and coming best. I can remember when I was younger, a girl looked at a guy and wanted to see someone who was enterprising, who wanted to work and get his own car, his own place to live, and who had dreams and goals to have a "better life"....a guy looked at a girl and wanted someone who could be his equal partner, either as a housewife, taking care of the home which is a FULL TIME JOB; or who had brains and capabilities and who could work outside the home and contribute to the security and stability of the family. Today, that "better life" is simply to not have to work too hard or too much.... live in your parents basement, where they pay all the bills, and don't do any more than is absolutely necessary. The only thing most of them worry about is where is the next party, the next beer or next drug coming from, and not how to pay for it because they can always steal something from someone else; or wait til next month's check comes from the gov't.

There is no sense of responsibility, no striving to have something of your own to be proud of. Regardless of whether it is a house on a quarter acre or a 100 acre farm or a 1000 acre ranch. They just don't care to work enough to get it.

Those that do work, they all want to start at the top, get top pay, right out of college, and do all the work they do inside in an air conditioned room on a fancy computer, if they do want to work. Just not tiring, sweaty, physical labor. But make sure those that do work get a gym membership to "keep in shape".

And oh yeah, food all comes from the grocery store and those "big farms out west"......

I agree with the unreliable thing too. How many have said they will be there and just don't show up....I'm too tired, it's too hot, my truck broke down...... oh the excuses. And NO i will not advance you money to fix your truck because you couldn't be bothered to call me. We have gone and picked up guys who needed a ride, to get them to work, and then have them steal from us behind our backs.

It needs to be "workfare" not welfare or whatever politically correct name they call it now. And it should only be allowed to cover the basics, and that if you are unwilling to take a job then you lose the benefits. There are many who cannot work, physically, at some jobs, but there are things that they can do. Quit handing it to those who are capable of doing something. Maybe we ought to stop trying to save all the ones that overdose and all that, like the tide pod thing, weed out some of the useless ones...... and the ones who steal like the cattle thefts, do deserve to be hung. We need to stop making excuses for all these people. I am so tired of the "they had a rough upbringing, they never had much, the father wasn't there, there was too much drugs and alcohol" .....blah blah blah.
Our society is falling apart, and it is being destroyed by the ones who are not making people take responsibility for their actions and are enabling these leeches to continue to drain the lifeblood from those that believe in being MORALLY and fiscally responsible.

Maybe these volcanoes and earthquakes and other disasters are a greater beings' way of trying to thin the populations.... That is sad but scary too. The problem with that, it takes the good as well as the bad.....

Another thing, it is true that farmers can't and don't pay enough. But honestly, you can't afford to pay more than you are able to make. Take the dairy industry....with milk prices what they are, a farmer cannot honestly pay more than $10/hr. The soon to be opened Chic-filet is offering $12/hr starting wage. I have been a milk tester for over 25 years, and my annual average taxable income is less than 23,000. Sure, I get non-taxed mileage, but I put alot of miles on my vehicle a year. I get my insurance, with a $6500 deductible, so practically useless for day to day medical needs. All these other jobs offer medical, sign on bonuses, paid vacation, etc etc. A farmer cannot compete. We need to make food less available or not so cheap so that people realize that they cannot live without it and that the farmer can get a FAIR price for something that is really an essential to life. But there will continue to be All these artificial things that are touted as food and people will pay for when it is cheaper so they have more disposable income for "play things"....

I don't know the answer. I don't know if there is one anymore. Maybe a depression like once was and soup lines???? but we are a global economy now as opposed to what we once were and don't know if that would get us back to a better economic basis....
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Till-Hill » Sun Jun 10, 2018 3:42 pm

Jan, the ones here can afford it. They are on the giverment tit too. I did rough estimate and guys up the road running 6,000 acres get about a $1 bushel giverment check every year.

All the dairy farmers here buy more farms. Wives all drive nice suv's, the guys all drive new diesel trucks. They can afford it. They chose not to.
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Workinonit Farm » Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:38 pm

farmerjan………… :nod: :clap: :clap: :nod: :clap: :clap: :tiphat:
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Bright Raven » Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:52 pm

Farming is a capitalistic enterprise. Farmers need labor and they are going to procure labor that is reliable and economic. Mexicans meet those objectives better than local white labor does. Simple as that.

Tobacco farmers in Kentucky do not lose sleep over the issues of morality, politics or socioeconomics - they care only about getting their "backer" in the barn and stripped out for market. It is really not that hard to understand.
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Stocker Steve » Sun Jun 10, 2018 5:11 pm

There are only two young families in our neighborhood. One dairies and all the kids help. The other is a two income family that goes to the lake place all the time. No kids to hire if you wanted to.
So I have been hiring seniors. My 76 year old haying help retired last year. I replaced him with a 67 year old. Not sure what happens next.
If I can hang on for a while - - I may be able to set up a farming boot camp for grandchildren. The Gift of Work is priceless.
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Workinonit Farm » Sun Jun 10, 2018 6:44 pm

Stocker Steve wrote:There are only two young families in our neighborhood. One dairies and all the kids help. The other is a two income family that goes to the lake place all the time. No kids to hire if you wanted to.
So I have been hiring seniors. My 76 year old haying help retired last year. I replaced him with a 67 year old. Not sure what happens next.
If I can hang on for a while - - I may be able to set up a farming boot camp for grandchildren. The Gift of Work is priceless.


My husband and I have found, that the 68 thru 75 year-olds are the best hired help! They show up on time, have a good work ethic, dress appropriately for the task at hand, are polite, respectful and civil to the customers. They are paid @ $15.00 pr hr. Anyone that works for us will get paid that rate. Only one "young person" has ever worked out as well as the older gents. Unfortunately, we didn't have enough work, on a regular basis, to keep him. His new employer has themselves a heck of a worker.

(the type of work I am referring to is landscape/hardscape)
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby farmerjan » Sun Jun 10, 2018 10:44 pm

Till-Hill wrote:Jan, the ones here can afford it. They are on the giverment tit too. I did rough estimate and guys up the road running 6,000 acres get about a $1 bushel giverment check every year.

All the dairy farmers here buy more farms. Wives all drive nice suv's, the guys all drive new diesel trucks. They can afford it. They chose not to.


Maybe in your area there is more money in milking, but here there isn't. I know several farmers that have been buying farms, and I have seen some of their balance sheets. Most are in hock up to their eyeballs. Sure they have alot and the banks keep loaning them money, but they are so deep in debt they will never get out. There is a farm that went big for this area, about 2,000 cows and they say the grand children will never pay off the debt. Yes, many do drive nice SUV's, many have new (er) trucks and alot of farm equipment....but they don't own it, they "rent it" from the money lenders.

The gov't needs to stop all these subsidy payments too. Pay a decent price for the goods produced, and stop all the handouts that often go to the big farmers. I think there should be a "safety net" so that on a bad year, all the farms do not go broke, like droughts etc., but there has to be a more equitable way to provide some base without giving everyone an incentive to produce for the gov't handouts.

It is a shame that we have gotten to where we are, and that the farm economy is so based on what is decided in Washington and the farm bill that is not about the farmer anymore. Most farmers I know that really care about what they are doing, want to make a decent living....not get rich but just make a decent living. As the farms get bigger, and more mechanized, they are also affecting all the support industries and these are slowly dying out.....

There are "kids" that maybe would work farm jobs if they could get a decent wage.... but for the most part more of them want the easiest way out.....and that is not sweating at a job that gives a sense of satisfaction. How many employed younger people are "happy" or even have a sense of satisfaction at their job nowadays? For many, it is "just a job"; and there is little pride in doing a job right either.
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Re: Farm Labor Shortage

Postby Dave » Sun Jun 10, 2018 10:54 pm

I know two guys in different professions who were let go that the boss told them "I can hire a Mexican cheaper." One was a herdsman for a large dairy the other was a concrete finisher. Both had 20 + years working for the same outfit. Three years ago I built a new house. Over half the guys who worked on it didn't speak a word of English. Painters, sheet rock, insulation, roofers and I have known Americans who use to do those jobs. But they won't do it for the money the illegals will.
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