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Re: Hurricane Michael put electric cost in perspective.

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2018 8:50 am
by ddd75
my all electric 2500 sq ft ranch with 14' ceilings this summer ran us around 100 - 130 / m with AC on. I put 2" poly iso sheets under my cool metal roof and the AC barely runs ever. Best thing I've ever done to a house.

Re: Hurricane Michael put electric cost in perspective.

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:05 am
by Caustic Burno
ddd75 wrote:my all electric 2500 sq ft ranch with 14' ceilings this summer ran us around 100 - 130 / m with AC on. I put 2" poly iso sheets under my cool metal roof and the AC barely runs ever. Best thing I've ever done to a house.


Cooling isn’t an issue with mine, if I had to do it over it wouldn’t have 18’ ceilings. I know we have many more cooling days than heating. My electric bill will run close to 300.00 for a couple months in the winter. Have to run the ceiling fans to keep from burning up upstairs or freezing to death down.

Re: Hurricane Michael put electric cost in perspective.

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:35 am
by greybeard
Caustic Burno wrote:
ddd75 wrote:my all electric 2500 sq ft ranch with 14' ceilings this summer ran us around 100 - 130 / m with AC on. I put 2" poly iso sheets under my cool metal roof and the AC barely runs ever. Best thing I've ever done to a house.


Cooling isn’t an issue with mine, if I had to do it over it wouldn’t have 18’ ceilings. I know we have many more cooling days than heating. My electric bill will run close to 300.00 for a couple months in the winter. Have to run the ceiling fans to keep from burning up upstairs or freezing to death down.


Interesting. I have tall ceilings too and winter is one of the cheapest periods for my all electric house. I don't have trees around my house to block the warming sunlight, which is a triple edged sword. High cooling costs---nothing can fall on the house, but the sunlight comes in unabated in the windows.

Re: Hurricane Michael put electric cost in perspective.

Posted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:55 pm
by backhoeboogie
JMJ Farms wrote:Met a guy today here in Middle Georgia that works with Oncor, out of Dallas, Texas. Said he was from Paris, Texas. He was up here with a lot of other Oncor trucks working on utility lines damaged in the storm. That’s a long way from home. I guess people have responded from all over the country. I’m sure they are being compensated but it’s still a big sacrifice. Thanked him for his help. And thanks to all the others. And I can’t remember his name.


My nephew is down there. He's with Oncor. A little farther west than Dallas tho

Re: Hurricane Michael put electric cost in perspective.

Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 2:21 am
by Supa Dexta
It's no wonder americans have lots of money to 'consume stuff', you pay less for everything... except health care.

I know of regular 4 person house hold bills over $1000 dollars here in the winter, for 2 month periods. No barns, no machines, just the house

Re: Hurricane Michael put electric cost in perspective.

Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 7:03 am
by ddd75
mines runs around 180 - 200 / m average in the winter with our family of 5 here all the time. heating the home to 72 degrees.

2x6 walls... R30 insulation sheets in the attic with a massive amount of blown in cellulose on top of that... with the 2" poly iso panels under the roof...

I don't even know if its raining out unless I look outside..

since they just dropped our electric rate in half I'm really going to be in high cotton.

Re: Hurricane Michael put electric cost in perspective.

Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 7:12 am
by HDRider
We are about .12 per KWH, .14 after added fees.

I have a 22 KW propane generator. It would eat my lunch to run that for a long period.

Re: Hurricane Michael put electric cost in perspective.

Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 7:32 am
by True Grit Farms
HDRider wrote:We are about .12 per KWH, .14 after added fees.

I have a 22 KW propane generator. It would eat my lunch to run that for a long period.

Someone needs to build a generator with a variable speed regulator and governor so it doesn't have to run full bore to provide 200 amps and 240 volts when only 10 or 15 amps are being used.