Bovi shield gold.

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tjmdo
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Bovi shield gold.

Postby tjmdo » Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:07 am

How long after calving do I have to wait until I can safely vaccinate cow and calf with Bovi-shield gold FP5 VL5 HB?
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Caustic Burno
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Re: Bovi shield gold.

Postby Caustic Burno » Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:26 am

tjmdo wrote:How long after calving do I have to wait until I can safely vaccinate cow and calf with Bovi-shield gold FP5 VL5 HB?



I use Vira Shield killed viruses never read a hold time. There is a note that milk production may reduce for a short period.
I vaccinate everything the first week January every year.
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Re: Bovi shield gold.

Postby Bright Raven » Sun Mar 11, 2018 11:16 am

tjmdo wrote:How long after calving do I have to wait until I can safely vaccinate cow and calf with Bovi-shield gold FP5 VL5 HB?


Bovi Shield Gold FP5 VL5 HB:
This is a MLV vaccine (IBR , BVD , PI3, BRSV) with Campylobacter fetus (Vibriosis) and 5 way Leptospira, plus you have the Hardjo Bovis serovar. You should vaccinate 4 to 6 weeks prior to breeding.

In the circumstances you provided, the cow is open, obviously, without saying, there is no danger of abortion. Personally, I would give her 5 days postpartum to adjust then vaccinate. However, some recent research on MLV Vaccines was reported to interfere with ovary cycles (Dr. Michelle Arnold, University of Kentucky). So you should be aware of that and give the cow 4 to 6 weeks to react to the vaccine before breeding her back.

The calf can be vaccinated at 1 to 3 months old. Or you can use an intranasal like Inforce 3 at birth.
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Re: Bovi shield gold.

Postby Dempster » Sun Mar 11, 2018 3:45 pm

Calves need to be about 3 months old prior to vaccinating to prevent significant maternal interference from the dam's colostrum. The FP product is the reproductive version of the vaccine, it should be given 30-60 days before turning out the bull. The calf does not need all that in it's vaccine and would be better off without it. Just use the straight bovi-shield gold 5.
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Re: Bovi shield gold.

Postby gcreekrch » Mon Mar 12, 2018 1:00 am

Bright Raven wrote:
tjmdo wrote:How long after calving do I have to wait until I can safely vaccinate cow and calf with Bovi-shield gold FP5 VL5 HB?


Bovi Shield Gold FP5 VL5 HB:
This is a MLV vaccine (IBR , BVD , PI3, BRSV) with Campylobacter fetus (Vibriosis) and 5 way Leptospira, plus you have the Hardjo Bovis serovar. You should vaccinate 4 to 6 weeks prior to breeding.

In the circumstances you provided, the cow is open, obviously, without saying, there is no danger of abortion. Personally, I would give her 5 days postpartum to adjust then vaccinate. However, some recent research on MLV Vaccines was reported to interfere with ovary cycles (Dr. Michelle Arnold, University of Kentucky). So you should be aware of that and give the cow 4 to 6 weeks to react to the vaccine before breeding her back.

The calf can be vaccinated at 1 to 3 months old. Or you can use an intranasal like Inforce 3 at birth.


Good post Ron, we vaccinate calves with intra nasal at birth and again at branding. Sometimes only 2 weeks apart. Not always the best protocol but best we can do considering all aspects. Cows are vaccinated with Vista Once which contains a pasturelle component that we discussed before the same day their calves are branded. Most of our cow herd is done at least 5 weeks before bulls go out. A few stragglers might only be a week vaccinated before bull turnout but likely won't be the first to cycle anyway.
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Re: Bovi shield gold.

Postby Bright Raven » Mon Mar 12, 2018 5:06 am

gcreekrch wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
tjmdo wrote:How long after calving do I have to wait until I can safely vaccinate cow and calf with Bovi-shield gold FP5 VL5 HB?


Bovi Shield Gold FP5 VL5 HB:
This is a MLV vaccine (IBR , BVD , PI3, BRSV) with Campylobacter fetus (Vibriosis) and 5 way Leptospira, plus you have the Hardjo Bovis serovar. You should vaccinate 4 to 6 weeks prior to breeding.

In the circumstances you provided, the cow is open, obviously, without saying, there is no danger of abortion. Personally, I would give her 5 days postpartum to adjust then vaccinate. However, some recent research on MLV Vaccines was reported to interfere with ovary cycles (Dr. Michelle Arnold, University of Kentucky). So you should be aware of that and give the cow 4 to 6 weeks to react to the vaccine before breeding her back.

The calf can be vaccinated at 1 to 3 months old. Or you can use an intranasal like Inforce 3 at birth.


Good post Ron, we vaccinate calves with intra nasal at birth and again at branding. Sometimes only 2 weeks apart. Not always the best protocol but best we can do considering all aspects. Cows are vaccinated with Vista Once which contains a pasturelle component that we discussed before the same day their calves are branded. Most of our cow herd is done at least 5 weeks before bulls go out. A few stragglers might only be a week vaccinated before bull turnout but likely won't be the first to cycle anyway.


Thank you, Dave. I will add a little on the recent findings regarding Modified Live Virus vaccines for IBR. A naive heifer is one never before exposed to the IBR virus. Upon first exposure of a naive heifer to the live IBR virus (through an MLV or the natural virus), the ovary is targeted, particularly, the corpus luteum. This can upset the estrus cycle. So it is important to give it 4 to 6 weeks prior to when you are going to turn the bull in or AI them. The publication says 6 weeks is preferable especially if you are breeding via AI.
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Re: Bovi shield gold.

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:09 am

Dempster wrote:Calves need to be about 3 months old prior to vaccinating to prevent significant maternal interference from the dam's colostrum. The FP product is the reproductive version of the vaccine, it should be given 30-60 days before turning out the bull. The calf does not need all that in it's vaccine and would be better off without it. Just use the straight bovi-shield gold 5.

This is what I had always preached & read - but - new research has proven all this information to be false - supposedly.
But, here is an excerpt from an article I had in a newsletter:
"As the calf ages, the colostral immune globulin levels start to drop off over time, and are mostly gone by around 3-4 months of age. This is an important concept to understand for two reasons: First, giving the calf an injectable vaccine before this time frame means that any antigens for diseases you are vaccinating for (IBR, BRSV, PI3, etc.) will be neutralized by the immune globulins delivered in the colostrum. Essentially, if you have vaccinated the pregnant cow for those same diseases, and the calf nursed properly, there is no need to deliver those same vaccines to the calf prior to 4 months of age.

The second reason not to give an injectable vaccine before this time frame is that the calf’s immune system is not ready to see and react to the vaccine. It takes time for the white blood cells responsible for the development of a systemic immune response to learn their jobs and be able to react to invading bugs. One important exception to the use of vaccines in young calves is the use of intra-nasal vaccines. These vaccines provide a localized immunity in the nose very quickly, and are not interfered with by colostral immunity. This is why these vaccines can be given immediately after birth, and at any time in the production cycle safely and effectively.
"
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Re: Bovi shield gold.

Postby Bright Raven » Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:20 am

Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Dempster wrote:Calves need to be about 3 months old prior to vaccinating to prevent significant maternal interference from the dam's colostrum. The FP product is the reproductive version of the vaccine, it should be given 30-60 days before turning out the bull. The calf does not need all that in it's vaccine and would be better off without it. Just use the straight bovi-shield gold 5.

This is what I had always preached & read - but - new research has proven all this information to be false - supposedly.
But, here is an excerpt from an article I had in a newsletter:
"As the calf ages, the colostral immune globulin levels start to drop off over time, and are mostly gone by around 3-4 months of age. This is an important concept to understand for two reasons: First, giving the calf an injectable vaccine before this time frame means that any antigens for diseases you are vaccinating for (IBR, BRSV, PI3, etc.) will be neutralized by the immune globulins delivered in the colostrum. Essentially, if you have vaccinated the pregnant cow for those same diseases, and the calf nursed properly, there is no need to deliver those same vaccines to the calf prior to 4 months of age.

The second reason not to give an injectable vaccine before this time frame is that the calf’s immune system is not ready to see and react to the vaccine. It takes time for the white blood cells responsible for the development of a systemic immune response to learn their jobs and be able to react to invading bugs. One important exception to the use of vaccines in young calves is the use of intra-nasal vaccines. These vaccines provide a localized immunity in the nose very quickly, and are not interfered with by colostral immunity. This is why these vaccines can be given immediately after birth, and at any time in the production cycle safely and effectively.
"


Inforce 3 provides immunity for BRSV, IBR AND PI3. Those 3 viruses can cause respiratory disease in young calves. Since Inforce 3 does not interfere with the calves acquired immunity through the mother, I use it immediately at birth.
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Re: Bovi shield gold.

Postby Dempster » Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:37 pm

I don't think you can call all that information false. It is very simplistic, but there are not black and white lines with this science. We want to pretend colostral antibodies follow a binary, all here one day and all gone the next time frame. But that simply isn't how they work.

Antibodies more closely follow a half-life style of decay. They don't all disappear at the exact same time and they don't slowly taper off at a constant rate.

Colostral antiboides should reach their maximum blood levels around 24 hours after birth. Following that, they have a roughly 3 week half life. This means that whatever level of antibodies the blood stream contained at 24 hours, the calf will only have half as many of those original antiboides at 3 weeks. If you wait a second half life (3 more weeks, now 6 total from birth) half of those left after the first 3 weeks will break down and now you have 25% of the antibody remaining. Go to 9 weeks from birth and you are down to 12.5% of the colostral antibodies remaining.

Compound on top of that the variability in colostrum quality, variability in time and volume of colostrum uptake, variability in vaccine response in individual cows producing colostrum, etc and you have to quickly conclude there is no right answer. Simply finding a workable answer is a challenge.

In companion animals, they work around this by implementing multidose vaccine schedules. Puppies do not receive 3 doses of parvovirus vaccine because it takes that many boosters to develop an immune response, but rather because there is significant variability in when maternal antibody has worn off and the individual pup will be able to mount an immune response. Therefore, they get vaccinated at 6 weeks, and 9 weeks, and 12 weeks with the goal being to develop immunity as soon as possible with the realization that some individuals will take longer than others. If everything was able to mount an immune response at 6 weeks, you would only do that shot with maybe a single booster at some point. But some are not ready until 11 or 12.

Cattle work in a similar method. Some calves would likely respond to an injected parenteral IBR vaccine at 3 weeks of age (those calves probably did not get as good of colostrum as they should of). Some calves wont respond until 14 weeks. Each producer needs to determine when they face the greatest risk and work with their veterinarian to develop a vaccine protocol that maximizes vaccine efficacy at that time frame. In some herds, that is going to look like an injectable at 2 months of age during branding. In other herds, there may not be one given until preconditioning at 6 months of age. There is no universal right answer, it's a decision that needs to be made on a herd by herd basis. With all that being said, I still feel like 3 months is a decent point at which to say most cattle will mount a decent response to a 5-way viral. They would certainly do better at 4 months, and better yet at 12 months, but at some point you have to weigh the risks with the benefits and decide what would be best for an individual herd.
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Jeanne - Simme Valley
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Re: Bovi shield gold.

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Tue Mar 13, 2018 6:57 am

I totally agree with your description of colostrum immunity decline.
My calves are super stressed with the weather here in NY from birth to 3 months. So, the Inforce 3 gives them added protection for 3 months. At that time, they get all their normal vaccine shots at "roughly" 3 months & again 4 weeks later.
I have had respiratory problems with calves after birth, so I feel FOR MY FARM, the nasal vaccine is well worth the money. Will it help? Don't know, but at least I am doing the best I can to help keep them protected.
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