Baby Calves and Buzzards

Cattle problems.
User avatar
Supa Dexta
GURU
GURU
Posts: 2088
Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2014 6:33 am
Location: Eastern Canada

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby Supa Dexta » Mon Oct 29, 2018 5:08 am

We get a few eagles around here at times..

Image
0 x

User avatar
kenny thomas
GURU
GURU
Posts: 8132
Joined: Sun Nov 16, 2008 7:16 pm
Location: SW tip of Virginia

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby kenny thomas » Mon Oct 29, 2018 5:31 am

:cry2:
Supa Dexta wrote:We get a few eagles around here at times..

Image

What do they kill there?
0 x
My thoughts only, don't bet the farm on them. KT

User avatar
Supa Dexta
GURU
GURU
Posts: 2088
Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2014 6:33 am
Location: Eastern Canada

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby Supa Dexta » Mon Oct 29, 2018 5:37 am

Killing Cattle is the reason they congregate like that - but local abattoirs waste is what they're after.

I haven't had issues with them though, see them take off with after birth once and a while but thats the extent of it.
0 x

elkwc
GURU
GURU
Posts: 1180
Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:21 pm

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby elkwc » Mon Oct 29, 2018 5:59 am

farmerjan wrote:I will have to agree more with Jeanne on the bald eagles. I have watched them come in and carry off live hens when I was running free range layers. Lost 123 that year and that is when I finally gave up free range layers. I know a few were gotten by the fox that had a den but I made sure that they were let out later in the morning and locked up in the evenings and that stopped. I watched them come in and swope down and pick up hens several times. The Eagle actually dropped hens 2 different times in a neighbors yard and came back to grab it back up. They took pictures to prove to me that it really was an eagle.
I also had a young immature eagle hanging with a group of the black buzzards for about a month when I was running the layers, and the first calf heifers were calving. I spent HOURS up there at pasture when they were calving. The eagle challenged me when I went to go into the converted trailer- made into a mobile laying coop- and it had a chicken dead on the ground eating it. Thinking at first it was a buzzard, I went to chase it off, and then when I got close, realized it was not a buzzard but a young eagle. It spread it's wings at me and dared me to try to take away it's meal. The chicken was already dead. I did not have my .22 or it would have been SSS. I'm not saying it would have gone after the newborn calves, but I honestly would not have been surprised. They are so hated in this western part of Va., they are called "white headed buzzards" by many. They have been seen getting baby lambs in Highland county, they hate the eagles out there.
I realize they all have to eat, and I did not begrudge an occasional chicken killed, but to systematically take one nearly everyday, was just too much. They are opportunists, just like the buzzards. There are not much as far as bodies of water that would support a population of eagles, but they are nesting in this area and have adapted to not relying on fish but to take other small animals.

Yes, buzzards do have a highly developed sense of smell. I believe they are the only bird that does.


I think that the thing many times people forget about animals is this they "have adapted" . Animals are just like humans in many ways. They adapt to their environment and many are like some humans they learn the easiest way to survive. And so what was true about an eagle 20 years ago has changed today. I've seen it in many animals including coyotes, lions, ect. They are becoming more dehumanized and have developed different habits.
3 x

User avatar
Ky hills
GURU
GURU
Posts: 1663
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2016 6:54 pm
Location: Clark County, KY

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby Ky hills » Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:12 am

elkwc wrote:
farmerjan wrote:I will have to agree more with Jeanne on the bald eagles. I have watched them come in and carry off live hens when I was running free range layers. Lost 123 that year and that is when I finally gave up free range layers. I know a few were gotten by the fox that had a den but I made sure that they were let out later in the morning and locked up in the evenings and that stopped. I watched them come in and swope down and pick up hens several times. The Eagle actually dropped hens 2 different times in a neighbors yard and came back to grab it back up. They took pictures to prove to me that it really was an eagle.
I also had a young immature eagle hanging with a group of the black buzzards for about a month when I was running the layers, and the first calf heifers were calving. I spent HOURS up there at pasture when they were calving. The eagle challenged me when I went to go into the converted trailer- made into a mobile laying coop- and it had a chicken dead on the ground eating it. Thinking at first it was a buzzard, I went to chase it off, and then when I got close, realized it was not a buzzard but a young eagle. It spread it's wings at me and dared me to try to take away it's meal. The chicken was already dead. I did not have my .22 or it would have been SSS. I'm not saying it would have gone after the newborn calves, but I honestly would not have been surprised. They are so hated in this western part of Va., they are called "white headed buzzards" by many. They have been seen getting baby lambs in Highland county, they hate the eagles out there.
I realize they all have to eat, and I did not begrudge an occasional chicken killed, but to systematically take one nearly everyday, was just too much. They are opportunists, just like the buzzards. There are not much as far as bodies of water that would support a population of eagles, but they are nesting in this area and have adapted to not relying on fish but to take other small animals.

Yes, buzzards do have a highly developed sense of smell. I believe they are the only bird that does.


I think that the thing many times people forget about animals is this they "have adapted" . Animals are just like humans in many ways. They adapt to their environment and many are like some humans they learn the easiest way to survive. And so what was true about an eagle 20 years ago has changed today. I've seen it in many animals including coyotes, lions, ect. They are becoming more dehumanized and have developed different habits.


I agree 100%. We often read or hear it said that animals like coyotes mainly eat rodents, and small animals and carrion etc., and are solitary animals. When I was a child, there weren't any coyotes here, although they were probably starting to move into the region slowly and steadily. By the time I was in my late teens early twenties they were getting pretty common, seemingly almost overnight. Now we hear them almost any night, and sometimes in daylight, in all directions. Very common to see them now in groups of 2-4, very rarely see just 1. The Dept of Wildlife folks go to great lengths in bear areas to make sure folks are "bear aware" and most of that translates to don't feed the bears, because they will become accustomed to that food source. In other words, just as you said they adapt to their surroundings and will gladly take advantage of an easy meal.
The buzzards are no exceptions either, those black buzzards can be voracious carnivores not just scavengers. I don't know if this is accurate or not but have heard that red headed turkey buzzards have ability to smell but that the black ones don't and that they will often travel close by the red headed ones to find carrion. I have noticed in recent years that on any given day there is likely to be black buzzards flying around. I figure they are looking for an easy opportunity if they spot it. Just a couple evenings ago, I was out in the yard with our 6 week old pups waiting for them to do their business, and a black buzzard came by real low within just what seemed like 2-3 feet above and beside me, between me and some of the pups. The mother dog came running toward the pups, I have noticed her look up quite a bit as around while the pups are out.
1 x

User avatar
farmerjan
GURU
GURU
Posts: 2123
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2016 7:54 pm
Location: Shenandoah ValleyVirginia

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby farmerjan » Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:33 pm

Ky Hills; You are right, the black ones do not have as developed sense of smell as the turkey buzzard. And they will not only "follow" the turkey buzzard, but drive them off a carcass.
Watch your pups closely as they will grab them if they can and destroy their eyes, them go after their rectums and literally eat them alive. Caught them doing that to a baby calf that was in a barn shed that had had scours. I had to destroy the calf as they were literally pecking and tearing it's rectum open. A couple of them never made it out of the shed, I was so mad.
0 x

User avatar
Bright Raven
GURU
GURU
Posts: 7783
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2017 10:57 pm
Location: Kentucky

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby Bright Raven » Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:11 am

The buzzards have abandoned their surveillance of my calf crop. The calves are about 6 weeks old on average.

Most of the buzzards were the "Turkey Vulture". They have a red head but are not properly called "Red Headed Vulture". Altough the cows don't trust them and I don't either, the fact is, the only thing they were after was the calf poop when it was in the "yellow" stage.

The Black Vultures were not eating the calf feces. They were probably attracted by the Turkey Vultures activities. I never saw any attack a calf. So far, I have not lost a calf due to either species of Vulture. I have seen the Black Vultures surround a cow with a new born calf. Either waiting to get the placenta or waiting to get at the calf or both.

I don't like either one around my newborns but I doubt the Turkey Vultures are any threat.
0 x
"Looking for an honest man".
Diogenes.

User avatar
TennesseeTuxedo
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 11833
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2011 7:49 pm
Location: Live in Franklin, TN farm in Warsaw, KY

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby TennesseeTuxedo » Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:22 am

I haven't seen a turkey vulture in many years.
0 x
You're not paranoid, they really are out to get you!

User avatar
Bright Raven
GURU
GURU
Posts: 7783
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2017 10:57 pm
Location: Kentucky

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby Bright Raven » Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:27 am

TennesseeTuxedo wrote:I haven't seen a turkey vulture in many years.


You must not be looking!!!! 75 % of the vultures overhead are Turkey Vultures.
0 x
"Looking for an honest man".
Diogenes.

User avatar
TennesseeTuxedo
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 11833
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2011 7:49 pm
Location: Live in Franklin, TN farm in Warsaw, KY

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby TennesseeTuxedo » Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:29 am

All we seem to have are those Mexican buzzards with the white wing tips.
0 x
You're not paranoid, they really are out to get you!

User avatar
Bright Raven
GURU
GURU
Posts: 7783
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2017 10:57 pm
Location: Kentucky

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby Bright Raven » Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:33 am

TennesseeTuxedo wrote:All we seem to have are those Mexican buzzards with the white wing tips.


No. You got these too. Warsaw is not in a vacuum.
Image
0 x
"Looking for an honest man".
Diogenes.

User avatar
TennesseeTuxedo
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 11833
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2011 7:49 pm
Location: Live in Franklin, TN farm in Warsaw, KY

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby TennesseeTuxedo » Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:50 am

Nope, not a one.
0 x
You're not paranoid, they really are out to get you!

User avatar
Jeanne - Simme Valley
GURU
GURU
Posts: 9481
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 6:46 am
Location: Central Upstate New York
Contact:

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Thu Nov 01, 2018 9:52 am

this is what my new ones are:
Image
1 x
Simme Valley of New York - http://www.SimmeValley.com
"We make a living by what we get,
we make a life by what we give."

User avatar
Bright Raven
GURU
GURU
Posts: 7783
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2017 10:57 pm
Location: Kentucky

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby Bright Raven » Thu Nov 01, 2018 10:20 am

Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:this is what my new ones are:
Image


That is the Black Vulture. Neither one has feathers on the head. The black has a grey or dark pigmented skin and the red is red pigmented or more likely from blood flow.
0 x
"Looking for an honest man".
Diogenes.

User avatar
Jeanne - Simme Valley
GURU
GURU
Posts: 9481
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 6:46 am
Location: Central Upstate New York
Contact:

Re: Baby Calves and Buzzards

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:30 am

Yeah, I just put together an article for my newsletter that is about the invasion of the black headed in Ohio.
0 x
Simme Valley of New York - http://www.SimmeValley.com
"We make a living by what we get,
we make a life by what we give."


Return to “Health & Nutrition”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest