Respiratory Issues....

Cattle problems.
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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by TCRanch » Thu Nov 29, 2018 7:24 am

So Fire Sweep & Chocolate Cow2 both used Inforce 3 & still ended up with pneumonia. CC2 I'm very sorry for the loss of your two calves! Which begs the question: is it worth it in the first place? Or similar to the flu vaccine, which may or may not target the particular strain & half the people that get flu shots still get smacked with the flu.

My vet said he's never dealt with or heard of as many ranchers treating pneumonia & losing calves this year. And once again, the 10 day forecast is predicting huge variations in the weather from upper 50's, then rain/t-storms, drop in temp, snow & lows in the teens. :bang:



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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by True Grit Farms » Thu Nov 29, 2018 7:39 am

TCRanch wrote:So Fire Sweep & Chocolate Cow2 both used Inforce 3 & still ended up with pneumonia. CC2 I'm very sorry for the loss of your two calves! Which begs the question: is it worth it in the first place? Or similar to the flu vaccine, which may or may not target the particular strain & half the people that get flu shots still get smacked with the flu.

My vet said he's never dealt with or heard of as many ranchers treating pneumonia & losing calves this year. And once again, the 10 day forecast is predicting huge variations in the weather from upper 50's, then rain/t-storms, drop in temp, snow & lows in the teens. :bang:

Take a grain wagon of whole corn and crack the gate and drive through the cows till you put out about 5-8 lbs per head including the calves and then just feed your best hay. Do this before a cold front is going to push through. I truly believe like in people, what you eat makes a big difference. I have no idea why corn works so well, but I feel it makes a big difference. I know that very few deer winter kill where they grow corn compared to where they don't.
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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by TCRanch » Thu Nov 29, 2018 7:48 am

True Grit Farms wrote:
TCRanch wrote:So Fire Sweep & Chocolate Cow2 both used Inforce 3 & still ended up with pneumonia. CC2 I'm very sorry for the loss of your two calves! Which begs the question: is it worth it in the first place? Or similar to the flu vaccine, which may or may not target the particular strain & half the people that get flu shots still get smacked with the flu.

My vet said he's never dealt with or heard of as many ranchers treating pneumonia & losing calves this year. And once again, the 10 day forecast is predicting huge variations in the weather from upper 50's, then rain/t-storms, drop in temp, snow & lows in the teens. :bang:

Take a grain wagon of whole corn and crack the gate and drive through the cows till you put out about 5-8 lbs per head including the calves and then just feed your best hay. Do this before a cold front is going to push through. I truly believe like in people, what you eat makes a big difference. I have no idea why corn works so well, but I feel it makes a big difference. I know that very few deer winter kill where they grow corn compared to where they don't.

We've never fed corn but happen to have a tote full of it for hubby's deer feeders. Worth a try! We've been alternating feeding prairie when it's nice, switching to brome, bermuda or alfalfa when it's cold.

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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by Bright Raven » Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:22 pm

TCRanch wrote:So Fire Sweep & Chocolate Cow2 both used Inforce 3 & still ended up with pneumonia. CC2 I'm very sorry for the loss of your two calves! Which begs the question: is it worth it in the first place? Or similar to the flu vaccine, which may or may not target the particular strain & half the people that get flu shots still get smacked with the flu.

My vet said he's never dealt with or heard of as many ranchers treating pneumonia & losing calves this year. And once again, the 10 day forecast is predicting huge variations in the weather from upper 50's, then rain/t-storms, drop in temp, snow & lows in the teens. :bang:


Hold on! Inforce 3 provides immunity for ONLY 3 viral types of pneumonia- IBR, PI3 and BRSV. Fire Sweep and CC2 do not know what microbe (or microbes as it could have been more than one) caused their pneumonia cases. The Bovine Respiratory Disease group of bacteria and viruses is huge.
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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by Stocker Steve » Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:30 pm

True Grit Farms wrote: I truly believe like in people, what you eat makes a big difference. I have no idea why corn works so well, but I feel it makes a big difference.


Stress is a huge factor with some diseases. So minimizing nutritional stress and minimizing handling stress can really help alot. Too many folks are relying on meds alone.
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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by gcreekrch » Thu Nov 29, 2018 2:29 pm

Have any of you done a post mortem and is Pasturella a concern in your areas?

We have been giving PM Once for several years and now have added Inforce to our calves at birth. The numbers born should not affect management for health. I can say that respiratory problems decrease every year.
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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by 76 Bar » Thu Nov 29, 2018 2:50 pm

Excellent post.

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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by TCRanch » Fri Nov 30, 2018 6:27 pm

gcreekrch wrote:Have any of you done a post mortem and is Pasturella a concern in your areas?

We have been giving PM Once for several years and now have added Inforce to our calves at birth. The numbers born should not affect management for health. I can say that respiratory problems decrease every year.

I've only lost the one steer last year (treated for pneumonia) & not posted. Don't know if Pasteurella is a concern here - never had one diagnosed with it.

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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by Bright Raven » Fri Nov 30, 2018 7:44 pm

This relates to Gcreekranch's comment about Pasteurella and necropsies. Pasteurella (Mannheimia) is a concern EVERYWHERE. The most common bacterium found in pneumonic lungs of cattle as a result of necropsies is Mannheimia haemolytica (formerly Pasteurella haemolytica). Also common is Pasteurella multocida. Both are part of the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex. According to the Merck manual these bacteria are ubiquitous in cattle are occur in the upper respiratory tract of most cattle.

As long as these two organisms only inhabit the pharynx or upper respiratory tract, clinical respiratory disease, or BRD associated with them is uncommon. The animal's normal bodily defenses keep these bacteria in check: in a healthy animal, they replicate slowly, are destroyed by antibodies and removed by macrophages. Respiratory tract infections (pneumonia) due to these two bacteria occur when the organism is inhaled. Under conditions of impaired pulmonary defenses, a severe necrotizing fibrinous pleuropneumonia develops. Spread of these organisms is by direct contact, or by ingestion of feed and water contaminated by nasal and oral discharges from infected cattle. Therefore these two bacteria are easily spread between cattle, especially when calves are crowded (as in shipment) or closely confined (as in a dairy calf nursery).
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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by Chocolate Cow2 » Sat Dec 01, 2018 2:35 pm

TC-Thank you for your kind words.
Another miserable week-end weather event here. This time, all calves are under a roof. We split them into 3 groups to accomplish this but they are really enjoying being warm & dry. Their human caretakers-not so much-as we're hauling feed to them but 'ya gotta do what 'ya gotta do.

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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by TCRanch » Sat Dec 01, 2018 5:42 pm

Chocolate Cow2 wrote:TC-Thank you for your kind words.
Another miserable week-end weather event here. This time, all calves are under a roof. We split them into 3 groups to accomplish this but they are really enjoying being warm & dry. Their human caretakers-not so much-as we're hauling feed to them but 'ya gotta do what 'ya gotta do.

Muck boots are your friend! Did you get pummeled last night? We ended up with just rain & 60 mph gusts, still blowing & more rain predicted. It's a muddy, nasty mess! But at least it isn't as cold - I haven't had to break ice for 5 days :banana:

So glad you were able to get your calves inside! Mine have some shelter in the woods & we put out more straw for bedding. Some snotty noses but otherwise acting perfectly fine; begging for cubes, none are lagging/coughing/watery eyes/heavy breathing/droopy ear(s). I think turning them out on the brome field helped as much as anything.

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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by Chocolate Cow2 » Sat Dec 01, 2018 9:01 pm

We had 2" of rain along with wind but not your 60mph stuff. 3" of rain a little farther north. Winds currently at 30-40mph with a snow, rain, sleet mix. Calves are amazingly good at understanding what we're doing for them. Two shelters open into pens with feed bunks and waterers. We filled feed bunks and let them out to eat. They ate, drank water and went right back under the roofs.
I've never pulled calves off the cows and gone right to town with them. I believe, as their owner and caregiver, I have a responsibility to make sure they're in the best health possible before selling. I owe it to the calves and to their buyers. But I gotta tell you-this time around has tested my beliefs. ;-) We're in a winter weather advisory until 6am.

Quite a few guys still have cows out on summer range with their calves at side. Lots of sorghum milo standing in fields and quite a few soybean fields still uncut. Guess a few droopy calves is a good problem as opposed to all the acres of unharvested fall crops I see.

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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by Jeanne - Simme Valley » Sun Dec 02, 2018 6:33 am

Different area - but the same scenario. MUD, MUD - under a foot of snow. Went from -14F to 45F in 24 hours. Been doing this all year. We now can see bare areas out in the pastures. Cattle are always put on "sacrifice" lots in winter. Most groups have gravel pads for feeders, but one does not. Getting to where I'm nervous about burying the tractor!!!! Have 11 replacement heifers - weaned since early Sept. Out with no protection - doing well. Have 10 fall born calves - with a 3-sided shed for shelter. During the "warm" spell, they decided to stay at the feeders with mom. They are a muddy mess - errr. So far, all healthy. Hope I'm not jinxing myself.
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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by Texas Gal » Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:35 am

My sick steer died this weekend. After talking to friends and neighbors, it appears we got off lucky with just the one getting sick. Seems like everyone around here has had problems with respiratory illnesses due to the weather this fall.

On a brighter note, as we were getting ready for church on Sunday morning, I noticed a cow in labor around 9:15. By 9:45, she had the calf and it was standing up. A new baby calf always make me happy. :D

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Re: Respiratory Issues....

Post by gcreekrch » Mon Dec 03, 2018 10:34 am

Texas Gal wrote:My sick steer died this weekend. After talking to friends and neighbors, it appears we got off lucky with just the one getting sick. Seems like everyone around here has had problems with respiratory illnesses due to the weather this fall.

On a brighter note, as we were getting ready for church on Sunday morning, I noticed a cow in labor around 9:15. By 9:45, she had the calf and it was standing up. A new baby calf always make me happy. :D




Give it both Intra nasal vaccines...….. :D :cboy:
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