Cow behavior question

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Splash
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Cow behavior question

Post by Splash » Sun May 12, 2019 10:22 am

Observation,

When my cows have a calf, the other cows don't let her group with the herd. if she gets too close, they push her out. Let her rejoin in about 5 days to a week. My cows are Brangus. Is this normal for all breeds? Any thoughts on why they do this?



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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by cowrancher75 » Sun May 12, 2019 10:30 am

how long has the herd been together? When first putting together mine they would do that.. and I had high coyote loses.

Now.. they all protect them and usually a few cows are with the calves at all times.

this is black angus.

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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by Splash » Sun May 12, 2019 10:37 am

They've been together longer they've been at my place. I bought most them as a group a couple of years ago. I haven't had any loses from coyotes but it's a concern for those first few days after birth until they rejoin the herd.

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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by Coosh71 » Sun May 12, 2019 1:22 pm

Ours are the opposite. Entire herd take possession of every calf. It's the "takes a village", saying with all my cattle. Haven't had coyote issues in some time now.

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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by Brookhill Angus » Sun May 12, 2019 1:33 pm

Coosh71 wrote:
Sun May 12, 2019 1:22 pm
Ours are the opposite. Entire herd take possession of every calf. It's the "takes a village", saying with all my cattle. Haven't had coyote issues in some time now.
Same here, sometimes the calves even nurse off the really old cows that are too slow to push them off. They are very tight knit.
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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by Bright Raven » Sun May 12, 2019 1:43 pm

Coosh71 wrote:
Sun May 12, 2019 1:22 pm
Ours are the opposite. Entire herd take possession of every calf. It's the "takes a village", saying with all my cattle. Haven't had coyote issues in some time now.
Same here. I absolutely love it. Each member of the herd goes over and smells the new calf. It is why I do this. It is all those kind of wonderful experiences you cannot get anywhere else.
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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by TCRanch » Sun May 12, 2019 2:00 pm

I've never had the herd not allow a new pair. And yes, most of them are curious about the new calf. I do, however, have some cows that choose not to join the herd with their new calves for a couple of days, primarily with the later Spring calves.

Had a new calf 2 days ago (only 1 left & I'm done this year!). Mama was eating her afterbirth when I walked up to check on the calf & I'll be darned if there wasn't a coyote not 10 yards away. She looked at it out of the corner of her eye, kept on eating and the 'yote simply trotted by - didn't even pay attention to the cow, calf or me. Clearly didn't phase the cow, she must have sensed it wasn't a threat, but it definitely surprised me.

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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by kenny thomas » Sun May 12, 2019 2:10 pm

Probably wishing for a bite of the afterbirth.
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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by Kingfisher » Sun May 12, 2019 6:55 pm

kenny thomas wrote:
Sun May 12, 2019 2:10 pm
Probably wishing for a bite of the afterbirth.
He would have got a “lead Sammy” from me.
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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by backhoeboogie » Sun May 12, 2019 7:49 pm

I had a brimmer char cross cow that went broody with every calf. We calved year round. If I pulled in to the pasture, she was the one to look for. Her actions let me know if there was a calf in the making. She'd have 8 to 10 calves hanging with her all the time. They'd nurse their dam but they'd hand with Big 'In. She was the boss for the herd too. When we changed pastures, she'd lead 'em out. Dang good cow.
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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by Splash » Mon May 13, 2019 7:19 am

Maybe it's just the Brangus breed? Seems they do it to most if not all the cows that give birth. They are back with the herd usually within a week. They will investigate the new borns' and allow them to mix with the other calves. It's just the new mommas they push out.

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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by Splash » Mon May 13, 2019 7:22 am

Coosh71 wrote:
Sun May 12, 2019 1:22 pm
Ours are the opposite. Entire herd take possession of every calf. It's the "takes a village", saying with all my cattle. Haven't had coyote issues in some time now.
I wish mine were like this. I have seen them chase both dogs and coyotes out of a pasture if they get to close to the herd/calves. 4 or 5 cows will chase them all the way to the fence. It's just that 1st 5-7 days that the new momma may have to defend on her own.

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Re: Cow behavior question

Post by jschoolcraft86 » Thu May 16, 2019 11:49 am

I run mostly brangus and mine all come get involved pretty quickly. As soon as the mama wants to reintegrate with the herd she doesn't have problems, and when I go to tag the baby I get the whole herd for an audience.
backhoeboogie wrote:
Sun May 12, 2019 7:49 pm
I had a brimmer char cross cow that went broody with every calf. We calved year round. If I pulled in to the pasture, she was the one to look for. Her actions let me know if there was a calf in the making. She'd have 8 to 10 calves hanging with her all the time. They'd nurse their dam but they'd hand with Big 'In. She was the boss for the herd too. When we changed pastures, she'd lead 'em out. Dang good cow.
I had one of these for awhile, but she was not a dang good cow. She came and got involved any time I did anything with any calf, and she was not very friendly about it. She got sent off about two years ago, but right before she left she calved and her bag was so beat up I had to bottle raise the baby. He's my mascot now and luckily is much friendlier than his mother. He doubles as a tug boat to get the herd movin when I want them to go somewhere.

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