Keeping Books on Average Gain

The place to start if you are new!
76 Bar
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 160
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 1:17 pm

Re: Keeping Books on Average Gain

Postby 76 Bar » Wed Jul 18, 2018 6:27 pm

Lots of ways to skin the cat :)
If you want ADG accuracy its mandatory to have accurate contemporary groups, record actual birth date/wt & likewise accurate weaning contemporary groups actual weaning date/wt, plug in DA and correctly do the math & ratio the respective groups. FWIW, in order to maintain moderation, I retain heifers that more or less fall into the year's average for weaning wt ratios.
With a few rare exceptions, high WDA ratioing calves are associated with late calvers. Decidedly not a trait I want, nor to replicate.
0 x

User avatar
Boot Jack Bulls
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 869
Joined: Fri Jun 05, 2015 7:03 pm
Location: NW WI

Re: Keeping Books on Average Gain

Postby Boot Jack Bulls » Wed Jul 18, 2018 7:22 pm

5S Cattle wrote:
Boot Jack Bulls wrote:Brute, your next step should be figuring out weaning ratios. It is really eye opening for most people just which cows are doing the most work. I also like to keep track of weight per day of age. This helps give insight to performance on heifers retained for breeding stock for example. I pretty much take a weight anytime I run something through the chute and log it on cattle max. Over time, the amount of info you can build up is astounding.

What kind of scale do you have and what’s it cost if you don’t mind. Was kicking around getting one the other day


I have a platform and read-out from Rice Lake Weighing Systems. They are hard to beat and made about 45 minutes away (I did not pay shipping, but it takes about 4 men or a skid steer to move it). Mine is certified and I can actually plug it right into my laptop when working stock if I need to. Mine is set in the alley behind my chute with about 1 inch space on the sides (so nothing can step down into a gap and get stuck/injured). I love that it is a flat, tread-plate platform. I use it for all my cattle, even the smallest calf or biggest bull, the horses, loads of goats, etc. I have used the trough style ones, but it was way to narrow for my bulls to stand in comfortably. I have also had a set of Tru-test bars under the chute, I think they are junk personally. :2cents: Off hand, I can't tell you what the price on the RLWS platform and read-out was, but I do recall that it was significantly more than either of the two other options we've had.
0 x
Boot Jack Cattle LLC & Boot Jack Boers

76 Bar
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 160
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 1:17 pm

Re: Keeping Books on Average Gain

Postby 76 Bar » Thu Jul 19, 2018 9:12 am

Place we leased had an old manual Howe platform scale which was extremely accurate. Relocated several years ago and after a lot of research, like BJB I purchased a Rice Lake platform scale & electronic read out. Dealer delivered it gratis & set up the read out. Expensive but stout and accurate. Gentle cattle here but nonetheless concerned that the bulls & cows would balk at entering the relatively small single animal enclosure. Quietly walked everybody through with both doors open as a training exercise and consequently, they willingly loaded and stood calmly for the real deal.
1 x

talltimber
GURU
GURU
Posts: 1282
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2014 6:29 pm
Location: Southeast Missouri

Re: Keeping Books on Average Gain

Postby talltimber » Fri Jul 20, 2018 8:03 pm

Boot Jack Bulls wrote:
5S Cattle wrote:
Boot Jack Bulls wrote:Brute, your next step should be figuring out weaning ratios. It is really eye opening for most people just which cows are doing the most work. I also like to keep track of weight per day of age. This helps give insight to performance on heifers retained for breeding stock for example. I pretty much take a weight anytime I run something through the chute and log it on cattle max. Over time, the amount of info you can build up is astounding.

What kind of scale do you have and what’s it cost if you don’t mind. Was kicking around getting one the other day


I have a platform and read-out from Rice Lake Weighing Systems. They are hard to beat and made about 45 minutes away (I did not pay shipping, but it takes about 4 men or a skid steer to move it). Mine is certified and I can actually plug it right into my laptop when working stock if I need to. Mine is set in the alley behind my chute with about 1 inch space on the sides (so nothing can step down into a gap and get stuck/injured). I love that it is a flat, tread-plate platform. I use it for all my cattle, even the smallest calf or biggest bull, the horses, loads of goats, etc. I have used the trough style ones, but it was way to narrow for my bulls to stand in comfortably. I have also had a set of Tru-test bars under the chute, I think they are junk personally. :2cents: Off hand, I can't tell you what the price on the RLWS platform and read-out was, but I do recall that it was significantly more than either of the two other options we've had.


Care to expand on the junk classification on the Tru Test bars under a chute statement?
0 x
If you cross the river before, leave a good horse on this side.

User avatar
Boot Jack Bulls
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 869
Joined: Fri Jun 05, 2015 7:03 pm
Location: NW WI

Re: Keeping Books on Average Gain

Postby Boot Jack Bulls » Fri Jul 20, 2018 8:47 pm

We had to keep replacing the mounts because they kept shearing off and the scale was not nearly accurate compared to our RLWS set-up. Our Tru-test bars were under the chute. Its a big chute (bigger than a Priefert, but not a Silencer for example), and our cattle are bigger (think 1600 pound cows and 2000 to 2700 pound bulls). It is inside, clean, well-cared for, and the cattle didn't hit the chute at a dead run. Side note, I also HATED how much of a step-up into the chute it made when the bars were under it! I can recall 2 times the bars had to be sent back to manufacturer because they just stopped working (not a wiring issue, or maintenance problem because the were 3 inches deep in cow dung, they just cr**pped out!). When they did work, they were super finicky to get a weight with. If a person stood on them to test before working stock, you couldn't twitch or it wouldn't take a reading. Mind you, all of these issues occurred in an about 18 month span. Rarely do I give poor reviews on equipment, but I have never been so happy to replace a specific piece of equipment!
0 x
Boot Jack Cattle LLC & Boot Jack Boers


Return to “Beginners Board”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Red Bull Breeder and 7 guests