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Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Sun Apr 19, 2015 9:37 pm
by Caustic Burno
:help:

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Sun Apr 19, 2015 11:26 pm
by greybeard
Caustic Burno wrote:GB I learned last week that you will be getting issued in the near future an Applicators license with a bar code
number on it assigned to just the applicator.
When you attend a CEU course upon completion you will swipe you license entering
you current CEU status into the system instantly.
There will be no more fudging CEU hours.
On top of that they are starting random inspection of your records this year.
Has your herd been certified TB free mine has. If you think that is free call me and I will let you in
on the secret it's not. Herd was quarantined until completion of a certified TB free herd you will comply.
I won the lottery I was selected as x percent of the state herd to be tested at random.
You can bet that is going to end up being mandatory as well.

Is there a downside to any of that other than the cost of the TB testing?
(I don't cheat on CEUs--it's just too easy to get them legit)
Everything I've heard about the random herd test for Bovine TB says "at no cost to herd owner".
"Random selection of herds was seen as the most equitable way to complete a statistically valid disease surveillance of purebred and seed stock cattle herds. By mid-April, a computer program will pick names from a database listing purebred and seed stock producers. We then will contact the ranchers to line up the test that will be conducted by private veterinarians at no cost to the herd owner," says Dr. Bob Hillman, Texas state veterinarian..

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:06 am
by Rafter S
In regards to the posts about so many sale barns closing, I suppose that's just part of a cycle. It was before my time, but the older folks told me that back when my part of the country was almost all cotton and corn, with a few cows along the creeks and in the woods, the closest place to sell cattle was at Port City Stockyards in Houston. And that was way before the Interstate highways, and Highway 6 sure wasn't the 4-lane divided highway that it is now. That trip to Houston and back took all day.

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 8:07 am
by Caustic Burno
GB what they don't tell on that TB test there is only a few vets testing on the "no cost".
Upon calling to schedule I was informed he could get to my place in the next three months.
Your herd is under quarantine until all testing is proved negative and signed off by the vet.
Options pen and pay the local vet or haul the cows to him or jam your head up your butt and wait
on the state.
I wasn't willing to have my cattle locked up one day by the state much less than 90 days or more.
Guess I am just sensitive as they ran me out of business the first time when they where quarantining
it under the Bangs program in an up cycle.
After 9 months of quarantine I hauled every one to Slaughter.
Not that I had a lot back in those days.

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 8:13 am
by 1982vett
Rafter S wrote:In regards to the posts about so many sale barns closing, I suppose that's just part of a cycle. It was before my time, but the older folks told me that back when my part of the country was almost all cotton and corn, with a few cows along the creeks and in the woods, the closest place to sell cattle was at Port City Stockyards in Houston. And that was way before the Interstate highways, and Highway 6 sure wasn't the 4-lane divided highway that it is now. That trip to Houston and back took all day.

Hahah....that trip still takes almost all day....4 lane divided hasn't helped all that much. :D

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 8:15 am
by Caustic Burno
Rafter S wrote:In regards to the posts about so many sale barns closing, I suppose that's just part of a cycle. It was before my time, but the older folks told me that back when my part of the country was almost all cotton and corn, with a few cows along the creeks and in the woods, the closest place to sell cattle was at Port City Stockyards in Houston. And that was way before the Interstate highways, and Highway 6 sure wasn't the 4-lane divided highway that it is now. That trip to Houston and back took all day.


Cattle were never big in that area then that was rice and row crop
as I mentioned earlier all along the Gulf Coast counties .
How much row crop is going on now?
I wonder to what happen to Port City.
http://www.sealynews.com/news/article_d ... b10f3.html

Owner of Port City
"Sartwelle cited long-term declining cattle numbers in their trade area, increased operating costs, and higher valued land as reasons for taking this action. The spreading Houston metropolitan influence has had profound influences on cattle numbers, competition for labor, and on real estate values."

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 8:53 am
by TexasBred
Caustic Burno wrote:Do you think if the drought had not happened and forced the sell off of 60% of the state herd prices would be where they are today.
No way would they be, this high is artificial and actually detrimental to us all.
We are forcing the consumer to look to alternative sources of protein.
This wasn't created by demand. It was created because we can not supply the consumer.



I disagree only with the use of the word "artificial". What you see IS the market today and we all understand that the market is controlled by many other factors besides the quality of the cow or calf. It won't last forever and when it turns down the big downturn won't be artificial either. Just an adjustment in prices based on outside influences. Always been that way and always will unless gov't steps in for some reason like they have with the stock market and created the huge upturn . THAT is a true artificial market !!!! And when it crashes it will crash BIG !!!!

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 9:01 am
by Caustic Burno
GB the ceu's was on the honor system when licence renewal came and you applied on line.
Guy I know applied got his and got caught when they audited the system hadn't been keeping up
his ceu's. Lost his license called and ask if I would supervise him to spray his place wasn't happy when I said no
way. I know more that were doing the same thing blowing off the ceu courses.
I know it is legal for me to supervise other operations I am not willing to keep up my education and records for
people to lazy or paying the cost to remain certified.

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 9:25 am
by Brute 23
The cattle market is not artificial.... inflated maybe... but it is real and not propped up by any outside force.

The cattle market will definitely change over the next few years. A lot of the places that are marginal for cattle will be pushed out but the more profitable areas will boom. I have probably 4-5 sale barns with in 50miles, 3 are with in 30.

Its always been about keeping inputs costs as low as possible because we have little control over the market. People who have been raising cattle generationally have seen these changes before. Its the only way to combat market change long term.

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:10 am
by greybeard
Caustic Burno wrote:

I wonder to what happen to Port City.
http://www.sealynews.com/news/article_d ... b10f3.html

Owner of Port City
"Sartwelle cited long-term declining cattle numbers in their trade area, increased operating costs, and higher valued land as reasons for taking this action. The spreading Houston metropolitan influence has had profound influences on cattle numbers, competition for labor, and on real estate values."

That's the "new" one in Sealy.
Port City yards used to be in Houston itself, somewhere around Calhoun. It moved to Sealy in '68.
Image
portcity

http://www.texasarchive.org/library/ind ... 2011_02281

An interesting read:
http://www.livestockweekly.com/papers/9 ... sartwe.asp

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:12 am
by Caustic Burno
Brute 23 wrote:The cattle market is not artificial.... inflated maybe... but it is real and not propped up by any outside force.

The cattle market will definitely change over the next few years. A lot of the places that are marginal for cattle will be pushed out but the more profitable areas will boom. I have probably 4-5 sale barns with in 50miles, 3 are with in 30.

Its always been about keeping inputs costs as low as possible because we have little control over the market. People who have been raising cattle generationally have seen these changes before. Its the only way to combat market change long term.


You are correct I should have used a 100 year anomaly high.

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:14 am
by Caustic Burno
greybeard wrote:
Caustic Burno wrote:

I wonder to what happen to Port City.
http://www.sealynews.com/news/article_d ... b10f3.html

Owner of Port City
"Sartwelle cited long-term declining cattle numbers in their trade area, increased operating costs, and higher valued land as reasons for taking this action. The spreading Houston metropolitan influence has had profound influences on cattle numbers, competition for labor, and on real estate values."

That's the "new" one in Sealy.
Port City yards used to be in Houston itself, somewhere around Calhoun. It moved to Sealy in '68.
Image
portcity

http://www.texasarchive.org/library/ind ... 2011_02281


I know where the first one was I took it he was talking about Sealy
The first time it moved the second it closed.

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:31 am
by fitz
bball wrote:
1982vett wrote:
Bigfoot wrote:Like everybody, I know they will go down, and I'm not looking forward to it. Has anybody figured the break even point on a 550 pound weaned calf. It's up there these days. Luckily fuel, and grain are cheap at the moment. My other inputs are not though.


I figured mine earlier in the year in the Gross Sales /Net profit Regional thread....

Re: Gross Sales /Net profit Regional
Postby 1982vett ยป Mon Jan 26, 2015 6:11 pm

Seed - 1141.84
Fertilizer - 4522.00
Feed - 487.1
--------------------------
Total - $6150.94 / 43 Calves is $143.04 with an average weaning weight of 523.10 lbs ..... now throw in fuel, insurance, depreciation, truck (Schedule F)...... that comes to $645.62 per weaned calf.... but that's just last year for me.

Don't know how that stacks up against others, but I'm fine with it. Hope this year is as good.

If calculations are correct....186 days to get their.


I could be all wet here, but here goes. I do it a bit differently...
I expect a cow to raise her own calf.
2014 my cost per cow per day was $1.54. That includes every expense associated with my beef operation (taxes,fuel,vaccines, wormer,grain, fertilizer, tags on trailer/truck, hay,etc)
Based on 190 days until wean @ $1.54/day = $292.60 per calf
That's what it costs me to maintain the cow that is raising that calf. All my expenses are built into the daily cost of operation. So basically, the more it costs per day to maintain a cow, the less money I make at weaning. These are Simm/ang cross that weaned at avg 573 lb. I do not overstock pasture. Like previously stated, we are really grass farmers, so it is imperative to maintain soil and forages while optimizing animal husbandry.


That daily cost sounds reasonable but what do you do with her the other 175 days of the year?

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:37 am
by Rafter S
Caustic Burno wrote:
greybeard wrote:
Caustic Burno wrote:

I wonder to what happen to Port City.
http://www.sealynews.com/news/article_d ... b10f3.html

Owner of Port City
"Sartwelle cited long-term declining cattle numbers in their trade area, increased operating costs, and higher valued land as reasons for taking this action. The spreading Houston metropolitan influence has had profound influences on cattle numbers, competition for labor, and on real estate values."

That's the "new" one in Sealy.
Port City yards used to be in Houston itself, somewhere around Calhoun. It moved to Sealy in '68.
Image
portcity

http://www.texasarchive.org/library/ind ... 2011_02281


I know where the first one was I took it he was talking about Sealy
The first time it moved the second it closed.


No, I was talking about the one in Houston. The time period I was talking about when there wasn't a closer place to take cattle was much earlier than when Port City moved to Sealy. The great-great-uncle I mentioned in the cow picture thread used to haul them there in a truck with sideboards on it. I remember him telling me that it was at Port City that he first saw a gooseneck trailer. He didn't think it was stable, and didn't see how the man pulling it would get home without wrecking.

By the way, speaking of Port City, they owned the auction in Brenham for a while, but I believe the Schulte family has it now.

Re: Today's workshop

Posted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:48 am
by greybeard
The old location is part of U of H now I believe. Intersection of Calhoun, MLK and Wheeler