Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Discuss grasses and how to grow and harvest them.
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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by greybeard » Fri Nov 09, 2018 1:11 pm

Caustic Burno wrote:Again nothing new we have done this to ourselves.
We imported the Chestnut blight and fired the starter pistol.
Out forestry management or lack of it destroyed 4 million acres of subtropical rain forest here.

Yeah, but I hear it looks so good when the city people drive by on the highway and them red cocked woodpeckers gotta have somewhere to nest...........


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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by ddd75 » Fri Nov 09, 2018 1:44 pm

we have 2/3rds the amount of trees we had in 1600 (usa)

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by Turkeybird » Fri Nov 09, 2018 6:49 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
Ebenezer wrote:Trees age out, too. Clearcut and let them start new. Not the acceptable answer but it works. In 100+/- years, you'll be glad that you did.


:lol: I doubt that. But somebody might.

Trees need culling just as cows do

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by snoopdog » Fri Nov 09, 2018 7:48 pm

The borers are killing our red oaks
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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by TennesseeTuxedo » Fri Nov 09, 2018 8:15 pm

The Ash are dying all over Kentucky.
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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by Bright Raven » Fri Nov 09, 2018 8:17 pm

TennesseeTuxedo wrote:The Ash are dying all over Kentucky.


They are totally gone here. I got a bunch of standing skeletons is all.
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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by TennesseeTuxedo » Fri Nov 09, 2018 8:28 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
TennesseeTuxedo wrote:The Ash are dying all over Kentucky.


They are totally gone here. I got a bunch of standing skeletons is all.


Likewise.
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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by kenny thomas » Fri Nov 09, 2018 8:37 pm

ddd75 wrote:
Lucky_P wrote:Cows are notoriously poor forest managers.
Hoof compaction, browsing/rubbing seedlings. etc., causes more damage and economic loss than the forage provided by running cows 'in the woods'; stats I've seen put forward say it takes about 40 acres of typical Southeastern forest to support 1 cow-calf pair.
Our cattle are fenced off from the 85 acres of hardwood forest, except for a 40-ft shade strip we allowed them when we fenced this place.
Oaks, hickories are fine. too many maples to suit me. EAB not here yet, but its just a matter of time, and the ash will be gone



depending on the time of the year and conditions.. cattle can really benefit a woods.

Explain this statement please because I have never seen that in Appalachian hardwoods.
My thoughts only, don't bet the farm on them. KT

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by littletom » Fri Nov 09, 2018 9:51 pm

Probably because all it ever does in ky is rain for the last 5 years anyway. I delt with the most awful fungus on tobacco for years. Became some what crazy over as it has cost me many thousands of dollars. So i do a lot of looking in the summers. Tree leaves are covered in fungus every summer. The plant pathologist and agronomist from uk are here every summer working with tobacco test plots. They sent several tree leaves in 50-11 different fungus on them weeds everything. Fact is the climate is changing all this rain is one big pima.

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by Bright Raven » Fri Nov 09, 2018 10:20 pm

littletom wrote:Probably because all it ever does in ky is rain for the last 5 years anyway. I delt with the most awful fungus on tobacco for years. Became some what crazy over as it has cost me many thousands of dollars. So i do a lot of looking in the summers. Tree leaves are covered in fungus every summer. The plant pathologist and agronomist from uk are here every summer working with tobacco test plots. They sent several tree leaves in 50-11 different fungus on them weeds everything. Fact is the climate is changing all this rain is one big pima.


The rain we got today puts us within one inch of being the wettest year on record for Kentucky.
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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by Ebenezer » Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:07 am

The pastures of today were hardwoods of yesterday. Funny that environmentalists never worry about what their house displaced, what their resort disrupted, what their trail bothers. The problem is always others.

Talk about hardwood changes in the east- talk about chestnuts.

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by Nesikep » Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:52 am

Bright Raven wrote:
littletom wrote:Probably because all it ever does in ky is rain for the last 5 years anyway. I delt with the most awful fungus on tobacco for years. Became some what crazy over as it has cost me many thousands of dollars. So i do a lot of looking in the summers. Tree leaves are covered in fungus every summer. The plant pathologist and agronomist from uk are here every summer working with tobacco test plots. They sent several tree leaves in 50-11 different fungus on them weeds everything. Fact is the climate is changing all this rain is one big pima.


The rain we got today puts us within one inch of being the wettest year on record for Kentucky.

I think we're pretty close to it too.. never seen a fall so wet.. hardly a week without rain since mid august.. I'm going to guess we got about 10 inches since then? On a dry year we get under 10 total, I think 17 is average?
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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by jwimberly » Sat Nov 17, 2018 10:19 am

hurleyjd wrote:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deforestation_in_the_United_States


That 1926 map can't be accurate. The Appalachian mountains today are certainly more than the few 25,000 acre dots shown. That's only 39 square miles.

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by True Grit Farms » Sun Nov 18, 2018 11:12 am

Ebenezer wrote:The pastures of today were hardwoods of yesterday. Funny that environmentalists never worry about what their house displaced, what their resort disrupted, what their trail bothers. The problem is always others.

Talk about hardwood changes in the east- talk about chestnuts.

Sounds like the environmentalists in Florida. The lack of water quality is all the farmers and cattlemens fault, no one worries about all the golf courses and swimming pools....or just all the people in general.
If we'd of know this we'd of picked our own cotton.

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Re: Loss of our Native Hardwoods

Post by kenny thomas » Sun Nov 18, 2018 8:55 pm

Ebenezer wrote:The pastures of today were hardwoods of yesterday. Funny that environmentalists never worry about what their house displaced, what their resort disrupted, what their trail bothers. The problem is always others.

Talk about hardwood changes in the east- talk about chestnuts.

In VA there are more acres of timberland now than in 1940. Many of the steep mountain farms are now in trees.
Yes the biggest impact on the eastern forest was the chestnut blight. Its a different forest but it's still forest land.
My thoughts only, don't bet the farm on them. KT

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