Best design for permanent facilities?

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Caustic Burno
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Re: Best design for permanent facilities?

Post by Caustic Burno » Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:04 pm

gcreekrch wrote:
Caustic Burno wrote:I used the minimum working pen design on this site for my layout.

https://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$Departmen ... _723-1.pdf



Them Texas Braymers work in a Canadian layout without getting confused? :D



Not at all, I just had them put on jackets before entering.


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Re: Best design for permanent facilities?

Post by backhoeboogie » Sun Jan 13, 2019 9:32 am

My working pens get worked a few times each year. My pastures are a daily routine. I like rotating pasture and when I rotate, they go down the lane to the working pens. The cows look forward to going down that alley.
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Re: Best design for permanent facilities?

Post by bird dog » Sun Jan 13, 2019 12:49 pm

Sometimes less is better. The comment on knowing your labor source is an important one. While my new pens will hold all my cows and calves at one time, I have found it much easier to leave the majority out of the main pens and work inside the pen area about 10 to 15 at a time. It is much easier to sort from a small group and the small calves don't get beat up or smashed up against the sides,

I have found that the cows left outside in the holding area see that the ones before them have been worked and released back to the pasture. The last groups will be ready to get it over with and readily move into the pens.

It is also much cheaper to build a small sturdy pressure area and some larger pens that don't have to be as stout.

The chute after the squeeze can go to the pasture or back into the pens. This is critical.
I always work the cows first and sort off the calves. This year I cross fenced the pasture where the pens dump out to so that the area is only about 6 or 7 acres. This keeps the cows close and and gets them easily back with their calf when it works later.

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