First things first.

The place to start if you are new!
Post Reply
User avatar
alisonb
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5035
Joined: Sat Jul 11, 2009 7:37 am
Location: South Africa
Has thanked: 250 times
Been thanked: 219 times

First things first.

Post by alisonb » Fri Jun 14, 2019 5:46 am

New neighbour shifted in about a month ago, he used to stay in town.

First he bought 20 sheep, now they just offlaoded around 20 cow/ calf pairs.

The fencing on his property is terrible. He believes he does not have to supplement their feed as there is sufficient grass(veld). The veld is basically nutritionless plus it is winter here. But apart from those minor details...he has absolutely no handling facilities :shock: .

Spose one good thing is that he has no bull...yet!

Beginners, heed this advice. Before buying animals make sure your handling facilities are in place :D


Few is the number who think with their own minds and feel with their own hearts. Albert Einstein
Never trouble trouble till trouble troubles you!

User avatar
Bright Raven
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 10110
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2017 9:57 pm
Location: Kentucky
Has thanked: 674 times
Been thanked: 691 times

Re: First things first.

Post by Bright Raven » Fri Jun 14, 2019 6:17 am

It is not uncommon for producers to not have handling facilities in Kentucky. The CAIP program has reduced the number of producers operating without facilities.

Some of these folks run the cow into an old tobacco barn. The problem still remains - they have no means to restrain the cow much less a bull. Before CAIP, some folks had board alley ways with a head gate at the end.

Some veterinarians have a policy that they will not make farm visits if the producer does not have facilities to restain the cow. Too many veterinarians have been injured tying a cow to a tree to pull a calf.

My dad and oldest brother ran beef cows on the family farm for 40 years with no handling facilities. The cows seemed fairly tame until you needed to handle one. Sometimes the only way you could assist on calving is when the cow went down and was so exhausted that she was no longer a threat. I guess it speaks to the functionality of the cows they had, because they never vaccinated, treated or wormed. I bought their last 4 cows. They were big. Average of the four was 1900 pounds. When I got my facility and tried to get them in, one big cow that I called "Big Bertha" started looking up over the wall of the crowding pen. To my amazement, when I crowded her, she leaped up on the wall and pulled her udder and hind legs the rest of the way over and went about grazing.

In conclusion, I totally agree.
"Looking for an honest man".
Diogenes.

User avatar
True Grit Farms
GURU
GURU
Posts: 9454
Joined: Mon Jan 04, 2016 4:29 pm
Location: Middle Georgia
Has thanked: 185 times
Been thanked: 573 times

Re: First things first.

Post by True Grit Farms » Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:19 am

I'm sure glad we have a old country vet that's not scared to snub a cow off to a tree or vehicle that needs assistance. The best handling facilities do you no good if you can't get the cow to them. Some folks have cows, some have pets.
If we'd of know this we'd of picked our own cotton.

User avatar
TN Cattle Man
GURU
GURU
Posts: 2931
Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2012 8:16 am
Location: Palmyra, TN
Has thanked: 23 times
Been thanked: 52 times

Re: First things first.

Post by TN Cattle Man » Fri Jun 14, 2019 8:00 am

A couple years ago we decided to bring in a Portable Working System into the Feed Store... not to sell, but to rent. We work closely with our local vets and this has been a great arrangement all the way around. A local producer who may have 20 head or so, can rent the system for the weekend for around $300.00. The Portable System is booked nearly every weekend.
As for me and my house... We will Serve the Lord!

User avatar
Son of Butch
GURU
GURU
Posts: 6226
Joined: Mon Aug 30, 2010 6:44 pm
Location: Frost Bite Falls, Minnesota
Has thanked: 170 times
Been thanked: 352 times

Re: First things first.

Post by Son of Butch » Fri Jun 14, 2019 8:15 am

Bright Raven wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 6:17 am
It is not uncommon for producers to not have handling facilities in Kentucky.
Some of these folks run the cow into an old tobacco barn.
The problem still remains - they have no means to restrain the cow much less a bull.

Some veterinarians have a policy that they will not make farm visits if the producer does not have facilities to restrain the cow. The cows seem fairly tame until you needed to handle one.
Sometimes the only way you could assist on calving is when the cow went down and was so exhausted that she was no longer a threat.
In conclusion, I totally agree. :nod:

User avatar
Ky hills
GURU
GURU
Posts: 2071
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2016 5:54 pm
Location: Clark County, KY
Has thanked: 350 times
Been thanked: 228 times

Re: First things first.

Post by Ky hills » Fri Jun 14, 2019 8:52 am

Those sheep especially the lambs will find holes in the fence pretty easily. In winter with not much to eat the cows will find or make bigger holes to go through, its a hard lesson a lot have to learn. Just hoping that for you they are some that learns pretty fast, and are good to work with when things don't go right.

User avatar
greybeard
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 18737
Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2012 5:51 pm
Location: Cleveland Tx
Has thanked: 109 times
Been thanked: 505 times

Re: First things first.

Post by greybeard » Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:03 am

True Grit Farms wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:19 am
I'm sure glad we have a old country vet that's not scared to snub a cow off to a tree or vehicle that needs assistance. The best handling facilities do you no good if you can't get the cow to them. Some folks have cows, some have pets.
Brings back some bad memories right there grit, and it's why after all these years, there's still some big stout posts, (sawn utility poles) sticking up in the oddest of places, because that's where we used to work a few cows.
Just needed the posts to have something to snub off to.
I couldn't do it today...not quick enough any more to get around the post before they do.
"For evil to flourish, all that is required is for good men to do nothing" Burke
Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely.
It ain't easy being a used cow salesman.

T & B farms
Trail Boss
Trail Boss
Posts: 389
Joined: Fri Sep 21, 2018 9:15 pm
Location: SW kansas
Has thanked: 83 times
Been thanked: 63 times

Re: First things first.

Post by T & B farms » Fri Jun 14, 2019 11:45 am

Portable coral was the best money I ever spend. Lots of herds of 15-30 head on rented pasture with no facility’s. Now I can setup and work/breed right in the pasture. It has made life so much easier

callmefence
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5726
Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2016 9:36 pm
Location: Fencemans place...central Texas
Has thanked: 261 times
Been thanked: 437 times

Re: First things first.

Post by callmefence » Fri Jun 14, 2019 12:03 pm

TN Cattle Man wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 8:00 am
A couple years ago we decided to bring in a Portable Working System into the Feed Store... not to sell, but to rent. We work closely with our local vets and this has been a great arrangement all the way around. A local producer who may have 20 head or so, can rent the system for the weekend for around $300.00. The Portable System is booked nearly every weekend.
Very smart move.....
Being in farm and ranch service . I can tell you. The money is in the little guys.
If it ain't tight , It ain't right.




You can all go to he// . I'll go to Texas.
David Crockett

callmefence
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5726
Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2016 9:36 pm
Location: Fencemans place...central Texas
Has thanked: 261 times
Been thanked: 437 times

Re: First things first.

Post by callmefence » Fri Jun 14, 2019 12:06 pm

alisonb wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 5:46 am
New neighbour shifted in about a month ago, he used to stay in town.

First he bought 20 sheep, now they just offlaoded around 20 cow/ calf pairs.

The fencing on his property is terrible. He believes he does not have to supplement their feed as there is sufficient grass(veld). The veld is basically nutritionless plus it is winter here. But apart from those minor details...he has absolutely no handling facilities :shock: .

Spose one good thing is that he has no bull...yet!

Beginners, heed this advice. Before buying animals make sure your handling facilities are in place :D

You wouldn't believe how many calls I get from people who have bought a horse. Have the thing tied up to a tree, cause they have NO FENCE
If it ain't tight , It ain't right.




You can all go to he// . I'll go to Texas.
David Crockett

Buck Randall
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 145
Joined: Wed Jun 05, 2019 1:45 pm
Has thanked: 41 times
Been thanked: 93 times

Re: First things first.

Post by Buck Randall » Fri Jun 14, 2019 1:15 pm

True Grit Farms wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:19 am
I'm sure glad we have a old country vet that's not scared to snub a cow off to a tree or vehicle that needs assistance. The best handling facilities do you no good if you can't get the cow to them. Some folks have cows, some have pets.
I'm not afraid to snub a cow to a post, but it'll cost you. It's funny how often farmers who have no way to get a cow to the chute start finding a way after they see the bill.

User avatar
TennesseeTuxedo
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 13956
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2011 7:49 pm
Location: Live in Franklin, TN farm in Warsaw, KY
Has thanked: 761 times
Been thanked: 696 times

Re: First things first.

Post by TennesseeTuxedo » Fri Jun 14, 2019 1:22 pm

TN Cattle Man wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 8:00 am
A couple years ago we decided to bring in a Portable Working System into the Feed Store... not to sell, but to rent. We work closely with our local vets and this has been a great arrangement all the way around. A local producer who may have 20 head or so, can rent the system for the weekend for around $300.00. The Portable System is booked nearly every weekend.
Southern States in Owenton, KY rents a pretty decent portable rig built by Titan West that has a Priefert squeeze chute and scissors style head gate for $100.00 a day.

I've been renting it twice a year for the past 5 years.
Making Cattle Today Great Again!
Sometimes you do have to throw out the babies with the bath water.

User avatar
alisonb
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5035
Joined: Sat Jul 11, 2009 7:37 am
Location: South Africa
Has thanked: 250 times
Been thanked: 219 times

Re: First things first.

Post by alisonb » Fri Jun 14, 2019 2:36 pm

Ky hills wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 8:52 am
Those sheep especially the lambs will find holes in the fence pretty easily. In winter with not much to eat the cows will find or make bigger holes to go through, its a hard lesson a lot have to learn. Just hoping that for you they are some that learns pretty fast, and are good to work with when things don't go right.
Thanks Ky hills...they seem like good people...just eager to get going I guess ;-)

Enjoying your 'beginner' tales all!!
Few is the number who think with their own minds and feel with their own hearts. Albert Einstein
Never trouble trouble till trouble troubles you!

User avatar
Jeanne - Simme Valley
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 10714
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 5:46 am
Location: Central Upstate New York
Has thanked: 428 times
Been thanked: 639 times

Re: First things first.

Post by Jeanne - Simme Valley » Sun Jun 16, 2019 10:34 am

Reminds me of incident that happened years ago (1978) when we moved to NY. Came here from Kansas. Back in Ks, the large animal vets had a corral/work chute that they would haul behind their truck & set up at your farm if you didn't have any facilities. - like for the annual castration & shots. OR - you had the choice of loading your animal up & unloading at their office/clinic.
Well, first year here, my daughter had a show cow/calf pair. Calf was a bull. So, in the fall, I contacted a local vet that had talked at one of her 4-H meetings. Said "I have a spring born calf that needed castration & could I make an appointment to bring him in". This way I would save on a "farm call". We load the calf up into our stock rack on the truck. Got to the clinic. Drove all the way around it. No unloading ramp. Strange. I go inside and say I have the calf there but where was I supposed to unload it?
NY is big dairy state. They were expecting a bottle baby not an 800# bull calf. Vet ended up giving him Rompum (sp?) and my daughter & I held him up against the side of the stock rack.
Hubby learned how to castrate our own after that! None of the vets have facilities - other than going to Cornell Univ.
Learning curve in new area.
Simme Valley of New York - http://www.SimmeValley.com
"We make a living by what we get,
we make a life by what we give."

Post Reply